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Resume Example

By: Mario Churchill

Finding a well-put-together resume example can be a big help to you while you are trying to craft the perfect resume for yourself. You can get many ideas of what to do, as well as what not to do, in regards to your own resume. A superior resume example will never be visually hard on the eyes, or as some people might say: "too busy." This would refer to a resume formatted in such a way that it is hard to read or understand.

The use of several different fonts, not enough "white space" on your document, too much information packed into too small a space, all of this can contribute to a resume that is just too hard to look at, much less read through, and will most likely end up in the employers' trash can.

A top-notch resume example will also never have incorrect contact information. After all, how can you expect a prospective employer to contact you if they don't have the correct information? This would be a terribly careless mistake to make and almost certainly make getting the job an impossibility.

A resume example will rarely be too long or too short, but should be the perfect size to get in the information you need, without going overboard. If you can fit all of your important and pertinent information on one page, that's great, but don't worry if you have to go on to a second sheet of paper. Anything longer than this should be avoided unless it is absolutely necessary.

On any resume example you observe, you should never find an objective that is too vague. The employer will want to know exactly what you are looking for and the skills you are hoping to utilize. This is not to say you should sound inflexible, but giving specific examples of what you can bring to the company and what you would like to get in return will be a much better way to go.

Another common mistake that should not be made is the use of personal articles and pronouns. These do not fit well in a business communication. For example, if you are pointing out an improvement or accomplishment from a former position, you would not want to say " I increased the revenue by 25% in a six-month time period," but would want to word it thusly: "Increased revenue by 25% in six months' time."

You will also not see a candidate using a "one size fits all" format on a good resume example. Hiring managers want to see the progression that you made at each previous job, and unless that is impossible for you to list due to a total lack of work experience, or extreme job-hopping, then the resume should list your positions and duties going back at least ten years, in reverse chronological order, as well as your education level. If you are just recently out of college, you may list your degree first; otherwise, your work experience should be listed first.

These are just some tips that you can get from looking at a superior resume example.

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About The Author, Mario Churchill


Mario Churchill is a freelance author and has written over 200 articles on various subjects. For more information on resumes or for a samples resume checkout his recommended websites.
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