Record Sales Before and on "cyber-monday"

By: Sharudin Rahmat ">

Wedbush Morgan Securities forecaster Michael Pachter recently sat down with GamesIndustry.biz to talk about his calculations regarding hardware and software sales for the end of 2007. Pachter notes that with regard to the top-selling hardware title of the holiday season, "depending on when we start counting, Guitar Hero has a chance to be number 1."

Earlier this year, DFC Intelligence, expert in video game and entertainment market research, released their forecasts for the gaming industry. Different sources make it quite clear that Nintendo Wii is whizzing past its competition in terms of sales but Microsoft's horse follows close behind. DFC analyst David Cole pointed out how likely Sony will be leading in the console race even if Nintendo's console continues to sell.

Every year there's a toy that sells out almost overnight. Worried parents spend days trying to track one down, and in the run-up to Christmas it becomes a must-have with children. Retailers in England have said that the following items are vanishing fast:

1) Nintendo Wii

2) HomerSapien - a robotic toy that looks and speaks like Homer Simpson

3) Xbox 360 Core

4) iTeddy - a teddy bear with a media playing device in its stomach

The Nintendo Wii managed to reclaim its number 1 position last October due to the release of Halo 3, after being consigned to second place by the Xbox 360 in hardware sales in September, according to the NPD results on the NeoGAF forums. The Wii sold 519,000 units in October, with the DS coming in second with 458,000 sold. In terms of software sales, Halo 3 was still on top of the pile, selling 433,800 copies, and the Xbox 360 version of Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock selling 383,200 copies.

On "Cyber-Monday," the Monday after Thanksgiving, consumers spent $733 million bargain hunting, up 21 percent from a year earlier, and some analysts expect that one-day tally to be topped as Christmas nears. Wal-Mart Stores, Best Buy Company and Amazon.com Inc. were among the principal online traffic winners the Monday after Thanksgiving, according to stats from Internet research firm comScore Inc.

Scott Silverman, executive director of Shop.org, said in a prepared statement, "on Cyber Monday, consumers remind retailers that there's nothing like a bargain to motivate people to spend." Shop.org coined the term "Cyber Monday" in 2005, after vendors observed a trend of people shopping online on the Monday after Thanksgiving. The website with the same name - CyberMonday.com - drew more than 1.5 million unique visitors on Cyber Monday, five times more than last year, according to Mall Networks, which powers the site.

ComScore is predicting that while Cyber Monday represented online retail's first $700 million day, several days this holiday season will see even heavier performances. Senior comScore Analyst Andrew Lipsman told InternetNews.com, "I think we can expect Monday [Dec. 10] to be one of the bigger days, if not the biggest." That could be the day when e-commerce hits the $800 million mark.

Cyber Monday has become the traditional kick-off to the online holiday shopping season. Coremetrics wagered that the top sales day would occur on Dec. 4. For its part, CyberSource forecast the heaviest volume of online holiday shopping would take place on Dec. 18. Still, there is an abundance of Web deals available to holiday shoppers, regardless of which day rings in record-breaking sales.

Gaming
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Gaming