The Nature Photographer And The Travel Writer

By: Andrew Goodall

A nature photographer and a?travel writer?worked together on an article for a glossy travel magazine. The article was a big hit, and after publication they got together for a drink. “You know," said the travel writer, “that was some great photography you took. You must have a great camera."

“Thanks," said the nature photographer. “And that was some terrific creative writing. You must have a great typewriter."

If you get this joke, you are probably a photographer who puts up with ridiculous comments every day. If you don’t get it…all the more reason why you need to read this article.

If you eat a great meal at a restaurant, you don’t compliment the chef on the quality of his saucepans. When we appreciate a great painting, we don’t automatically think about the brand of paintbrush. When you hear your favourite song…well, you can see where I am going with this. So why is it that so many people think that good photography is all about how much money you spend on your camera?

A camera is the tool a photographer uses for?his or her?craft.

There are dozens of brands and models available, with myriad minor features that sound good in a camera shop. But good photography, as it always has, requires only the most basic features available in just about any camera: aperture, shutter speed, and a good lens.

In the days of film, these features were only available on SLR and larger format cameras, so it could be argued that they belonged to the realm of ‘serious’ photographers. However, in the digital age, these essential features are available on almost any camera, should the owner take the time to learn how to use them.

Regardless of what type of camera they use, a photographer employs their appreciation of light, an individual flair for composition, and a sense of timing that captures the subject in a way that makes a point, tells a story, or just looks pretty. These skills are the product of experience and creativity, and have nothing to do with technology.

I was once guest speaker at a camera club where one of the members brought a whole suitcase full of camera gear to the meeting. There was no reason to bring cameras to that particular meeting, and by all reports he wasn’t much of a photographer, but he wanted everyone to see how much expensive gear he had. What he did not seem to grasp was that cameras don’t earn you respect as a photographer – photos do.

If you want to improve your photography, never assume it will automatically happen with a better camera. Instead, settle for the camera you can afford, and learn to use the camera you have. Remember; aperture, shutter speed, a decent lens and a flair for composition and light. Master these and you will get results no matter what sort of camera you have.

Don’t be intimidated by photographers with thousands of dollars worth of equipment. Instead, intimidate them with your photography…in the endFree Articles, only results matter.

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