Burn Your Own Path

By: Tamara Jong

On September 22nd, 1904, Ellen Church was born and history changed. Her career path would steer her twenty-six years later, May 15th, 1930, into the Airline industry. Before that eventful day, people were reluctant to fly and felt that air travel was unsafe. Enter Ellen Church; a registered nurse with the love of flying. Originally vying for a pilot position, she refused to take no for an answer. She convinced Steve Stimpson of Boeing Air Transport to take her on in a newly created position of an Airline Stewardess. No big deal? She was the first Airline Stewardess, ever. Her place was to ease passengers fear by having a nurse by their side. Stimpson agreed to hire eight other nurses and history was made.

Inspiring, bold, proactive and persistent. Ellen Church turned a no into a yes. She made a place for herself in that organization. What was her secret and how does it relate to your job search? A job search is much the same. You need to be different in your approach but be prepared to hear no and have a few doors shut in your face.

Learn from that opportunity and come up with a new game plan. She didn’t back down, but found another way.

Research. Research. Research.

This cannot be stressed enough. Why would a company want to hire you when you haven’t given any thought to it’s core values and business? Isn’t this what we dislike in Telemarketers who read to us from a script verbatim and expect us to buy into it? Many companies have websites with a plethora of information on what they do, their mission and what their people are like. Check out local papers and the business section. Often there will be name-dropping of important decision making executives. Scan the web for information. You can get a potential foot in the door if you prepare properly.

Don’t Be Generic

When applying for a job, if at all possible, get the decision maker’s name. Scan the website, attend network functions, find out who’s hiring. There are many directories and magazines that run a special feature about who is doing well in the business world. Find out where you fit in and who you’re going to target. Be specific and relentless. Take the time to address and tailor your cover letter.

Jill Appleton (not her real name) tried this approach and it worked for her. After sending out 100 emails she received the one reply that mattered. There wasn’t a career page (Unheard of, you say?) or contact name for employment so she emailed the President and asked if there were any openings for her background. As it turned out, he was thinking about hiring someone in the Marketing department. They set up a meeting and she got the job. Coincidence, luck maybe? Perseverance will get you the job, but being smart and creative will secure it.

Remember Ellen Church? Innovator, Humanitarian, History MakerFeature Articles, War Heroine. Not a bad way to spend your life. What will they say about you?

Email Tamara @info@canjobs.com

Motivation
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