Suffering From Anxiety

By: The Work/Life Experts at eni

(GAD) if you often feel anxious about your family, health or work even when there are no signs of trouble. Anxiety is a natural reaction that prepares us for danger, or important events. The problem with those who suffer from GAD is that their feelings interfere with their work and life.

Someone with GAD may have a good job, a happy marriage and well-adjusted kids, but worries constantly that it is all going to fall apart. Constant worrying may result in chronic physical symptoms, such as aches and pains, irritability and fatigue. GAD may be diagnosed when exaggerated worrying lasts for more than six months.

One major approach to treating GAD is cognitive behavioral therapy.

1. Understand how you feed your negative
thoughts- Therapists can teach you how to
change your anxious reactions.

2. Reality-test your thinking- For example,
you're doing well at your job but constantly
worry you'll be fired. Using cognitive
behavior therapy, a therapist may start by
analyzing the facts, such as whether you've
gotten a good review lately and whether others
in your company are really being fired.

3. Engage in a five-minute worry session- Using
this technique twice a day can give you time
to be worried, but not let it affect the rest
of your life. You can worry all that you
want, type your feelings into the computer, or
record yourself. By giving your worry an
outlet, you can begin to refocus your thinking
and change your perspective.

4. Learn basic stress-management techniques- It
is important to know how to unwind when you
are anxious, and learn to prevent a build-up
before it begins.

If cognitive behavioral coping skills fail to control your condition, counseling and/or medication can be considered. Medication will not necessarily stop the worry, but can ease it. Medications prescribed for GAD may have troublesome side effects, so make sure to monitor your intake with your doctor. Use the proper steps to help you get your anxiety under control before it controls you.

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