Anxiety And Your Child

By: Jeff Foster

Child anxiety seems so out of the ordinary; after all, what could a child have to worry about?

They do not pay the bills, have to worry about peer pressure, or even deal with the stresses of employment. Despite all of these things which children do not need to worry about, children are still very subjective to the effects of anxiety.

Kids worry about their schools, their health, the health of their families, world events, their families and a host of other things that seem like the things that would be quite far from their mind.

Many of these topics may seem very 'adult' but that is exactly how child anxiety works. They worry about things which should not worry them at their age - leading to the development of phobias, panic disorders, and even OCD or obsessive compulsive disorder.

Many consider these symptoms to be very rare and never occurring in their own worrisome youngster. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. In reality, these symptoms can usually go unnoticed, if you are not even considering child anxiety to be the problem.

Some of the most common symptoms of child anxiety include restlessness, fatigue, irritability, insomnia and difficulty in concentration. In most cases involving child anxiety, the children do not understand their condition and so it makes it harder to pinpoint the exact problem.

If these symptoms seem to match the behavior of your child then seek the help of a psychotherapist or pediatrician. Of course, use medicines and other drugs as a last resort and only for severe conditions.

Many cases of mild anxiety can be cured by relaxation time, such as a back rub before bedtime, positive self-talk, such as I am sure you know the 'You Can Do It' lectures, and even praising them for daily tasks, for example, when they help you with unloading the dishwasher or getting a good grade on a test or quiz.

During this time of treatment for child anxiety, it is also very important that you not hide your child's condition from them. In some cases, just knowing what the problem is can be a way to help your child to relax and things could begin to improve.

Another form of anxiety is known as selective mutism anxiety. This is when a child refuses or is unable to speak in a specific situation where speaking is expected of him or her. Some times, the child will be able to speak in slightly different situations but do not assume the worst of your children. This could be something which they cannot control with professional intervention.

If this seems like your child, then you should probably seek professional guidance. Remember, it is never safe to do a self-diagnosis. You could be right, but let's leave the final analysis to the experts.

In the meantime, try some other therapeutic techniques like positive reinforcement, role playing, teacher involvement and relaxation training.

Child anxiety can be very scary but you and your little one can tackle it, step by step.

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