Treating Eating Disorders is not Easy

By: David Karlson

Treating eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia and binge eating can overlap one another because the causes can be quite similar for any eating problem. These disorders are growing across the country.

Anorexia and bulimia are psychological problems that are manifested by the numerous social influences pushed on women that require them to be thin like a supermodel. Binge eating can sometimes be attributed to issues of not being able to cope with stress or life changes.

There are many ways of treating eating disorders. However, it can be quite difficult to overcome a disorder if this type. In most cases, the sufferer cannot overcome the problem on their own. The most important step is that the individual must talk to someone and seek some form of treatment. The treatment may involve admission to a clinic, taking part in support groups and consultation with a psychotherapist or psychologist.

When treating eating disorders, many experts recommend that both the psychological and physical issues be treated at the same time. Experts also recommend that sufferers of anorexia or bulimia start eating small amounts of fruits and vegetables along with adding a small amount of protein to their diet. Food that is high in zinc is also a good idea as it can help to stimulate the individual's appetite.

When treating eating disorders, experts usually find out that the problem was attributed to such things as low self-esteem, sexual abuse, peer pressure, lonely, inferiority complex or other forms of abuse. Some experts also believe that a lack of zinc in the diet can lead to an eating disorder.

Treating eating disorders is very important because often these problems start out as psychological problems but will quickly advance into a serious medical condition from either over eating or not eating enough at all.

In conclusion, treating eating disorders is a process that usually involves being treated for a psychological condition. It is not easily treatable but it can be treated successfully over time.



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