Anorexia and Ecstasy Have the Same Nature

By: Dr Irina Webster

The mystery of anorexia biochemical cause could be unraveled according a new research of Dr. Valerie Compan of Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Montpellier, France.

The findings of this new study showed that both anorexia and ecstasy reduce people's appetite by stimulating the same receptors in the brain.

These receptors are located in the part of the brain which is responsible for pleasure, addiction and laughter. It also gives us reward feelings.

The research was done only on animals at this stage. They stimulated these receptors in the brains of Mice: this led to the mice starting anorexic-like behavior that significantly reduced their appetite.

The researches also noticed that stimulating these receptors make the mice produce the same kind of enzymes in their brains, which are produced as a response on amphetamine and cocaine use in humans.

When these receptors were blocked, the mice's appetite increased and the researchers found that the mice were less sensitive to drugs like ecstasy.

This study indicates the possibilities of developing new kinds of drugs, which affect this particular part of the brain by blocking its receptors and reversing the effects anorexia has on the pleasure centers' of the brain.

To conclude, this research showed that anorexia and ecstasy addiction have the same biochemical base. And this new research could lead to a possible fix for the biochemical cause of anorexia by developing a new treatment regime for it.

Although this is a good breakthrough in understanding eating disorders and how they play out in the brain; there are other causes involved in developing eating disorders.

These causes are environmental, social and behavioral which still have to be addressed separately. It is normally these causes that lead to an eating disorder in the first place, before the chemical reaction hooks the sufferer into continuing their unhealthy behavior. Find out more at
http://www.mom-please-help.com

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