Dental Bonding: What is It? What Problems Does it Fix?

By: Patricia Woloch

Embarrassed by your smile? Do you avoid looking others directly in the eye for fear they will notice? You're not alone. What your dentist may consider a small imperfection may be a big flaw in your eyes that keeps you from participating fully in life. If this is true for you, then you may be interested in a dental procedure known as 'bonding.'

Dental bonding is a conservative and very effective way to enhance your smile with an easy treatment that requires little, if any, advanced preparation and usually no enamel reduction Dental bonding uses a composite resin filling that reduces or eliminates natural flaws in your teeth, such as:

&bullSmall gaps between front teeth
&bullChipped teeth
&bullCracked teeth
&bullDiscolored teeth
&bullUneven teeth
&bullGum recession
&bullTooth decay

There are several steps to the bonding process:

1)Your dentist applies a thin adhesive coating to the tooth
2)Your dentist applies the bonding material
3)The bonding material is molded, tinted and reshaped
4)A high-intensity light hardens the bonding material
5)The tooth's new surface is finely polished

Bonding offers a natural, aesthetically pleasing result where your dentist's artistic abilities can really shine through. As each bonded tooth is molded to create a custom tooth shape, you become one step closer to a harmonious smile that matches your unique personality

There are two types of bonding:

Minor Corrections

For correcting small fillings and fillings in front teeth, bonding is a good solution that can generally be completed in one dental visit. Color matching to your natural tooth provides a nice result and the bonding adds strength to a weakened tooth.

Major Corrections

For greater durability and strength, such as needed by a large filling, tooth colored fillings can be created at the dental lab. First, a mold is made of your teeth and you'll receive a temporary filling. The dental laboratory creates a very durable, custom-fitted filling made of porcelain, then bonded to your tooth on your second visit.

Both types of bonding offer natural-looking, durable and stain-resistant results.

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