Foul Mouth? Its Quite Common

By: Patricia Woloch

Bad breath is something all of us deal with from time to time, but if you suffer from chronic bad breath, you know that it stems from something more than just a pungent meal or random failure to brush. If you are losing the battle with bad breath after changing your eating habits, brushing obsessively, and living on what feels a diet of almost nothing but breath mints and mouthwash, it's time to look deeper.

Chronic bad breath is embarrassing and can radically impact your social interactions at work and during leisure activities and, worst of all, can put distance between you and your spouse and other loved ones. If you live with chronic breath problems you may feel self conscious and isolated, but you should know that it's actually quite common, and it can be solved.

Chronic bad breath can be caused by underlying medical issues, and should not be ignored. Persistent low-grade sinus infections, diabetes, liver disease, gallbladder dysfunction, and allergies are just a few possible medical causes.

More often the source is anaerobic bacteria, hiding somewhere in your mouth. Anaerobic bacteria thrive and grow in an oxygen-free environment. They are often harbored in the grooves of your tongue and the pockets of your gums. Normal daily dental hygiene can't get to them.

Tooth decay and infection can also be the source of bad breath and cause a bad taste in your mouth. Gum disease (periodontal disease) is another common source.

Mouthwash, breath mints, and chewing gum can make it worse

Most mouthwash contains alcohol. Alcohol actually dries your mouth out, creating a more hospitable environment for anaerobic bacteria and making bad breath worse. Breath mints and gum don't really improve your breath. They only cover or mix with the bad odor, and promote tooth decay. In the long run they contribute to, rather than reducing bad breath.

Eliminating bad breath

Fortunately, bad breath can be eliminated. The first step is talking to your dentist, because most chronic breath problems are dental in origin. Your dentist will identify the source, whether it is your tongue, gums, or teeth. He or she can also tell you if your breath problem lies outside of dental issues, requiring other medical attention.

Dental treatment for chronic breath problems will typically involve tongue scraping (debridement), gum treatment, and the removal of tooth decay. Your dentist may also prescribe a mouthwash or mouth rinse that is alcohol free and targeted to destroy bad breath.

Dental Surgery
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Dental Surgery