Arthritis Myths & Facts

By: Janet Martin

We live in the computer age where information can be easily accessed at the click of a link. Sad to say, the information superhighway is also a portal for misinformation, especially when it comes to arthritis. A click here and there can lead you to bad websites that offer conflicting views and opinions about arthritis that can lead you astray rather than help your condition.

As a public service to readers, here are some arthritis myths and facts courtesy of Flexcerin, the natural choice for safe and effective arthritis pain relief:

Arthritis is a natural consequence of aging. False. Dr. Donnica L. Moore, the founder and president of DrDonnica.com, a popular women's health information website, said that while the risk of arthritis increases with age, it isn't a normal part of the aging process. Rather it is a group of diseases characterized by severe joint pain and inflammation that can affect anyone regardless of age, sex or race.

Arthritis only affects women. False. While a lot of women (over 28 million) have arthritis, the disease also affects men who number over 18 million, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Arthritis affects only postmenopausal women. False. Many types of arthritis begin in the 20s and 30s and even toddlers can get the disease. Juvenile or childhood arthritis currently affects 300,000 kids in the United States.

Arthritis is caused by cold, wet weather. False. It's a common belief that dry weather is good for arthritis. This has caused some people to move hoping they will be cured. However, arthritis can strike anywhere regardless of the weather.

Arthritis is caused by a poor or bad diet. False. Except in gouty arthritis that is caused by a purine - rich diet, there is no connection between food and arthritis. "Except for individuals who are found to have specific food allergies that aggravate their arthritis, there is no proven connection between a particular food source and arthritis. However, we do know that a nutritious, well-balanced diet and ideal weight can improve health and wellness for everyone, arthritis or not. Weight control is especially important for people with arthritis, because being overweight puts added stress on your arthritic joints," said the editors of allaboutarthritis.com.

Arthritis can be cured. False. While science continues to search for a cure for arthritis, that doesn't make you helpless. There are many things you can do to alleviate the pain and discomfort of the disease. "Physicians now know more than ever before about the best treatments for arthritis and how to slow down the progression of the disease. Advances in pain management, physical therapy and preventive care address the symptoms of arthritis while a cure for this disease is sought," said allaboutarthritis.com.

To restore motion and flexibility to swollen and painful joints, try Flexcerin, a powerful and comprehensive joint formula that stops arthritis pain and helps rebuild, lubricate, and soothe swollen joints to give you freedom from stiffness and the mobility you need to lead a normal life. Check out http://www.flexcerin.com for more information.

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