Information on Ankylosis of Teeth With Treatment and Prevention

By: Juliet Cohen

Ankylosis of teeth is the fusion of the tooth to the bone, preventing the tooth from erupting. The cause of this is not known, but it is seen fairly often, particularly in lower primary molars. Theories include trauma and heredity. There are three potential problems that can occur. Because the ankylosed tooth is fused to the bone, it will no longer erupt normally and will appear submerged. This can lead to malpositioning of the teeth on eithe side of it and super-eruption of the opposing tooth in the opposite dental arch. Ankylosis of teeth can happen in both primary teeth and permanent teeth, and may occur at any stage during development or eruption. A typical patient will present flared upper incisors, crowded, lingually displaced lower incisors, increased overbite, and severely tipped second and third molars.

Ankylosis may happen at any moment during outbreak and can head to submergence.

After outbreak it halts any adaptive changes as facial increase carries the adjoining occlusal airplane vertically. This gives the image of being submerged. The eventual diagnosis is thus based on clinical findings of a steep, clear-cut tone on percussion as easily as immobility. An exam and x-ray are the principal diagnostic methods for determining ankylosis. Some cases expect postoperative extractions for orthodontic and utilitarian purposes. An ankylosed tooth can push adjoining teeth out of stance, which can impact the morsel. A postoperative process may be required to forcibly go the ankylosed tooth to its accurate stance. In some cases, the tooth may get to be extracted. The timing of this is reliant upon the growth of the lasting tooth and can better be determined by routine followup and x-ray testing of the region.

An ankylosed tooth has a higher pitched or dulled sound as opposed to the more cushioned sound of a normal tooth. If more permanent teeth of the buccal segment are affected, this is defined as a general disturbance of the periodontal tissue. The prognosis for active elongation of ankylosed teeth is uncertain or poor. Several solutions are recommend for ankylosis, depending on the specific tooth and child's situation. With younger children, simply recommend monitoring the situation for a period of time, to watch how the primary and permanent teeth develop. Special, sophisticated instruments can be used to identify ankylosis. Sooner or later It may recommend removing the ankylosed tooth, to ensure that child's permanent teeth can develop straight and strong. Sometimes orthodontic steps may be taken to ensure that your child's teeth align and the bite is correct.

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