Full Detailed Information on Eczema

By: Alien

The term "eczema" is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions. These include dryness and recurring skin rashes characterized by one or more of these symptoms: redness, skin edema, itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. Areas of temporary skin discoloration are sometimes due to healed lesions, although scarring is rare. Eczema is a very common condition, and it affects all races and ages, including young infants. About 1-2 percent of adults have eczema, and as many as 20 percent of children are affected. It usually begins early in life, even before asthma or hay fever. Most affected individuals have their first episode before age 5 years.

Eczema Causes

The exact cause of eczema is not known. Although it is activated by the immune system and is related to allergic reactions, it is not the same as other allergic reactions. People with eczema do have the IgE antibodies (immunoglobulin E) produced by the immune system as part of allergic reactions.

What does eczema look and feel like?

Although eczema may look different from person to person, it is most often characterized by dry, red, extremely itchy patches on the skin. Eczema is sometimes referred to as "the itch that rashes," since the itch, when scratched, results in the appearance of the rash.

Eczema can occur on just about any part of the body; however, in infants, eczema typically occurs on the forehead, cheeks, forearms, legs, scalp, and neck.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms?

Signs and symptoms of eczema can vary widely during the early phases. Between 2 and 6 months of age (and almost always before the age of 5 years), children with eczema usually develop itchy, dry, red skin and small bumps on their cheeks, forehead, or scalp. The rash may spread to the extremities (the arms and legs) and the trunk, and red, crusted, or open lesions may appear on any area affected.

Treatments of Eczema - When the focus of your daily diet is that of organic raw foods you discover two amazing things. When you eat over 50% of your foods raw you find that you have a greater resistance to diseases such as eczema. Your body will have the ability to self heal skin rash, eczema, asthma and hay fever.

You also discover that the pace as which you age is dramatically reduced.

So what can eating raw foods do you for eczema?

#1 - Treatments of Eczema - If you suffer from eczema and eat above 60% of your foods raw and organic you are affected in a totally different manner physiologically than an Eczema sufferer who eats mostly cooked foods in high quantities.

#2 - Treatments of Eczema - Raw foods have the ability to help your skin to radiate. Your skin will heal, glow, and tighten giving off high levels of radiance. You will also radiate more energy if you reduce the amount of cooked foods you eat and increase the raw.

Is It Contagious?

Eczema is not contagious, so there's no need to keep a baby or child who has it away from siblings, other children, or anyone else.

How can eczema be prevented?

Eczema outbreaks can usually be avoided with some simple precautions. The following suggestions may help to reduce the severity and frequency of flare-ups:

* Moisturize frequently
* Avoid sudden changes in temperature or humidity
* Avoid sweating or overheating
* Reduce stress

Top Searches on
Skin Disorders
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Skin Disorders