Eczema Treatment Information and Prevention

By: Juliet Cohen

Eczema is a skin problems. Eczema is a general term for a rash similar to the skin. Eczema is also called dermatitis. Eczema is often very itchy, and when you scratch the skin to become red and inflamed. No fewer than 15 million people in the United States have some form of eczema. It occurs in adults and children, but appears most often on babies. You are more likely to have eczema if you have a family history of the disease. There are many forms of eczema. Atopic eczema is believed to have a hereditary component, and often runs in families whose members also have hay fever and asthma.

Approximately 10% to 20% of the world 's population grows atopic dermatitis. Contact dermatitis is a term for a skin reaction resulting from exposure to allergens or irritants. The allergic reaction often develops over a period of time through repeated contact with the substance. Contact dermatitis is of two types: allergic (resulting from a delay in responding to certain allergens, and irritant (resulting from the direct response to a solvent). Another type of eczema xerotic eczema. Xerotic eczema is dry skin which becomes so severe, it will become eczema. It worsens in winter dry, and the trunk and branches are often the hardest hit.

Seborrhoeic dermatitis causes dry or greasy extension of the scalp and eyebrows. Varicose eczema affects the lower legs of those in their middle to late years. It affects people aged over 50. Eczema can be exacerbated by dry skin. Hydration is one of the most important self-care for people suffering from eczema. Sedative antihistamines are sometimes used to reduce the itch. Capsaicin applied to the skin acts as a counter irritant . Other agents that act on nerve transmissions, like menthol, also have been found to mitigate the body's itch signals. Diet restrictions and chemical skin-drying agents may also used.

Eczema Treatment and Prevention Tips

1. Anti-histamines to reduce inflammation

2. Topical steroids are applied thinly to the affected area.

3. Oral steroids are sometimes prescribed in very severe cases.

4. Avoid excessive scrubbing and toweling after bathing your child.

5. Avoid giving your child frequent hot baths, which tend to dry the skin.

6. Apply moisturizing ointments , lotions, or creams to your child's skin regularly.

Skin Disorders
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