Ringworm- How to Get Rid of It?

By: james sameul
Ringworm. Who thought of that name? It's not even a worm! It's a fungus. I suppose, perhaps, that scabies and similar mite and worm infections had something to do with this one, but you'd think someone would set the record straight and fashion a new name for the problem. So, how do you get rid of a ringworm? You shower, you wash your hands, and you put a little Lamosil on the ring-like rash that pops up. I guess you can pour (or smear) some bleach on the stuff, and that'll kill it, but seriously-you could caterize it and that would kill the fungus too. If you're going to do this one right, do it with something that's proven to be a safe antifungal medication, or something close to medication, like tea tree oil. You can't go wrong with tea tree oil. That stuff is an Australian miracle juice. It's holy water for fungal and bacterial skin infections.

Ringworm is a fungal infection. It is contagious and appears on the skin with spots around the edges, red rings and scaling. It is easy to get ringworm, but how to get rid of ringworm is the hardest to do. It is difficult to get rid of ringworm because you will notice its presence when they are already about five days in your system.

how to get rid of ringworm

Turmeric is used since very ancient times in the treatment of ringworm. A solution of the turmeric powder is made and applied directly on the affected skin. Turmeric is also given mixed with honey to the patient in oral form.

Face it, the flea is a formidable foe that has been hopping about for centuries. Even rabbits envy their reproduction rates. Fleas are generally less than 3/16" long and can jump 150 times their size. That's the equivalent of a person being capable of leaping 1,000 feet in the air! A flea rarely makes it past its first birthday, but don't drop your guard. Before it heads to flea heaven, a female flea can produce 600 offspring per month for a whopping total of 7,200 fleas during its brief life.

Ringworm is very mildly contagious. It can be caught from domestic animals (especially dogs and cats) as well as most farm animals. The infection can be caught from the animal directly, or from anything the animal rubs against. Ringworm can also be caught from other humans, both by direct contact and by prolonged contact with flakes of shed skin (from sharing clothes or from house dust, for instance).

Try using an "athlete's foot" medicine from the drug store. Lamisil works best because it actually kills the fungus that causes ringworm. In fact if you go to the dermatologist they may tell you to just buy an over the counter medicine. Other meds you can use include Lotrimin and Micatin.Taking care of your skin starts with cleaning in the area that you suspect ringworm is about to erupt. Use as soap, such as Selsun Blue (shampoo for dandruff) to clean the ringworm.

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