Asthma - Preventing an Asthma Attack

By: Peter sams

About one in 15 people has asthma, a chronic condition whose symptoms are attacks of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. There is no cure for asthma, but most people can control the condition and lead normal, active lives.

Different things set off asthma attacks in different people. Smoke from cigarettes or a fire, air pollution, cold air, pollen, animals, house dust, molds, strong smells such as perfume or bus exhaust, wood dust, exercise, industrial chemicals--all can trigger an attack.

Asthma cannot be cured, but most people with asthma can control it so that they have few and infrequent symptoms and can live active lives.

Asthma attacks are not all the same-some are worse than others. In a severe asthma attack, the airways can close so much that not enough oxygen gets to vital organs. This condition is a medical emergency. People can die from severe asthma attacks.

Taking care of your asthma is an important part of your life. Controlling it means working closely with your doctor to learn what to do, staying away from things that bother your airways, taking medicines as directed by your doctor, and monitoring your asthma so that you can respond quickly to signs of an attack. By controlling your asthma every day, you can prevent serious symptoms and take part in all activities.

Asthma Symptoms
&bullwheezing
&bullshortness of breath or trouble breathing
&bullcoughing, either during the day or at night, but often worse at night and with exercise and activity
&bullchest pain or chest tightness
&bulldecreases in your child's usual or predicted peak flow or poor performance on pulmonary function tests

Preventing an Asthma Attack
House dust exposure can be lessened by using bare floors, vacuuming frequently, and changing furnace and air cooler filters frequently. You should avoid using feather, wool, or foam bedding. Use polyester pillows and plastic covers over your mattress.

It's important to avoid all triggers to prevent having an asthma attack. Below are resources to help you manage asthma, tips to help you recognize an asthma attack and advice on planning ahead.

The best way to prevent an asthma attack is to avoid your triggers as much as possible. It's also important to learn how to recognize what might be known as your "early warning signs" of an impending asthma attack. These are symptoms that happen just before an asthma attack begins. They tell you that your condition is about to worsen,or get out of control.

They might include things such as a frequent cough, especially during the nighttime hours, getting short of breath more easily, increased peak flow meter readings, feeling extra tired when you're active, a change in mood toward the negative, and trouble sleeping. You might also notice signs of a cold, such as nasal stuffiness, sore throat, sneezing, or runny nose. If you notice any of these symptoms, take action quickly to prevent an asthma attack.
Regular physical activity is important for good health. Keep your environment clear of potential allergens.
Don't smoke because smoking is always a bad idea for the lungs. Cromolyn and nedocromil, which are used to treat mild persistent asthma.
Theophylline, which is used either alone to treat mild persistent asthma Leukotriene modifiers, which are used either alone to treat mild persistent asthma.

Top Searches on
Medical Conditions
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Medical Conditions