Complete Information on Cytomegalovirus

By: Juliet Cohen

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that infects most people worldwide. People are usually infected by the time they are 2 years old or during their teenage years. HCMV infections are frequently associated with salivary glands, though they may be found throughout the body. HCMV infection can also be life threatening for patients who are immunocompromised. Other CMV viruses are found in several mammal species, but species isolated from animals differ from HCMV in terms of genomic structure, and have not been reported to cause human disease. CMV is mainly a problem for certain high-risk groups.

Unborn babies whose mothers get infected with CMV during the pregnancy risky of cytomegalovirus. Other danger element is children or adults whose exempt systems have been weakened by disease or drug handling, such as organ transplantation recipients or folk infected with HIV. CMV transmission is normally innocuous and seldom causes sickness. A robust exempt structure can have the virus in cheque. CMV is normally an asymptomatic transmission. In immunocompetent individuals, symptomatic disease normally manifests as a mononucleosis syndrome. CMV shares many attributes with new herpes viruses.

Sime include genome, virion structure, and the ability to cause latent and persistent infections. Common symptoms of Cytomegalovirus include fever, swollen glands and feel tired. People with a compromised immune system (such as AIDS patients or those receiving chemotherapy) may experience more serious illness involving fever, pneumonia and other symptoms. It is most common for symptoms to show up in people who are aged 10-35 when they are first infected, and particularly teenagers aged around 15-17. CMV remains in the body throughout a lifetime. Infected people may occasionally shed the virus in urine or saliva.

Treatment depends on the severity of the condition. Drinking plenty of fluids and medical supervision are good for this condition. Pregnant women and patients with suppressed immunity need careful medical monitoring and frequent testing, including blood, sputum and urine tests. Antiviral medication may be prescribed. Oral antiviral medication may also be used at home once the infection is under control and the patient is stable. In bone-marrow transplant patients, CMV-immune globulin (CMV-IVIG) and the anti-viral drug ganciclovir given intravenously can be used to fight CMV infections.

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