Complete Information on Costello Syndrome

By: Juliet Cohen

Costello syndrome is a rare, distinctive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, characterized by soft, loose skin with deep palmar and plantar creases, loose joints, distinctive coarse facial features and skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. Characteristic craniofacial features may include an abnormally large head (macrocephaly); low-set ears with large, thick lobes; unusually thick lips; and/or abnormally wide nostrils (nares). CS may affect many different body systems, but the range and severity of health problems varies widely. Approximately one hundred and fifty individuals worldwide are known to be affected.

Babies with CS are normally of natural birth weight. From birth, children with CS have feeding difficulties, which include a serious antipathy to taking solids or fluids orally and reflux. Some babies expect pipe or gastrostomy eating. Infants may be significantly cranky and allergic to say and tactile stimuli, and this may induce disturbed slumber. Children and adults with CS resemble one another facially. Facial features include Macrocephaly (a comparatively big chief), low-set ears with big, dense lobes and dense lips. Many children produce Papillomata (tiny wartlike growths) around the lip, nostrils and new moist system areas.

People with Costello syndrome have an increased danger of developing sure malignant and noncancerous tumors. Small growths called papillomas are the almost popular noncancerous tumors seen with this circumstance. They normally produce around the nose and lip or near the anus. The almost regular malignant tumor associated with Costello syndrome is a tender tissue tumor called a rhabdomyosarcoma. Other cancers too have been reported in children and adolescents with this disorder, including a tumor that arises in developing heart cells (neuroblastoma) and a kind of bladder cancer (transitional cubicle carcinoma.

Costello syndrome mutations of this gene reason cells to rise and split perpetually quite than in reaction to particular signals to make then. This continual irregular cubicle class and overgrowth results in malignant and non-cancerous tumour increase and is thought to be accountable for the new distinctive signs of Costello syndrome. There's no remedy for Costello syndrome but treatments are in growth. Sometime positive maintenance assistance with eating in earlier childhood to particular training - and handling for complications such as eye problems can assist affected children hit their prospective.

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