Complete Information on Erythromelalgia

By: Juliet Cohen
Erythromelalgia is a disease rare and characterized by the redness of the skin, the enlarge temperature, and the pain in the ends (of the feet and the hands), which usually occurs in response to heat and the moderate exercise. Erythromelalgia can be primary or secondary with the disorders myeloproliferative (for example, will vera of polycythemia, thrombocythemia), with hypertension, the venous insufficiency, the mellitus of diabetes, the SLE, RA, the sclerosus of lichen, the drop, the disorders of spinal cord, or the multiple sclerosis. Secondary erythromelalgia can result from the peripheral neuropathy of small fibre from any cause, hypercholesterolemia, poisoning of mushroom or mercury, and some disorders autoimmune.



Erythromelalgia affects more females than males. The majority of the symptoms of the erythromelalgia are episodes of erythema, swelling, and a painful extreme feeling mainly in the ends. These symptoms are usually symmetrical and affect the lower ends more frequently than the higher ends. The symptoms can also affect the ears and the face. The symptoms can remain soft during years or become enough serious to cause the total disablement. The causs of the erythromelalgia is changes neuropathological and microvasculaires. Several drugs including/understanding bromocriptine and verapamil.

Cause also contributed of mushroom poisoning of erythromelalgia. The treatment is action to avoid, rest and altitude of heat of the end. Certain treatments also used for the erythromelalgia such as the blocks, the epidurals, the sympathectomies, infusions of nitroprusside, and the antagonists laid out well of calcium. The aspirin is preferred because it provides lasting relief the longer than that of the indomethacine or other drugs anti-inflammatory drugs nonsteroidal (NSAIDs). A fresh environment is useful while keeping against symptoms, the use of the cold water baths is discouraged because such a use can cause necroses it skin.

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