Drug Eruptions Lichenoid - Prevention Tips and Treatment Methods

By: Juliet Cohen

Drug eruptions can mimic a wide range of dermatoses. Lichenoid eruptions are rather common dermatoses that can be induced by a great number of environmental agents and are clinically but not pathogenetically well defined. Our hypothesis was confirmed by clinical resolution three weeks after discontinuation of sildenafil citratus; moreover, the patient avoided the drug for about four months, and the eruption didn't reappear. A drug-induced reaction should be considered in any patient who is taking medications and who suddenly develops a symmetric cutaneous eruption. Lichenoid eruptions are quite common in children and can result from many different origins. In most instances the precise mechanism of disease is not known, although it is usually believed to be immunologic in nature.

Many of these lesions are self-limited and only require symptomatic treatment, although corticosteroids can hasten resolution in certain disorders. Discontinuation of the medication is often sufficient for resolution of lichenoid drug eruptions. Drug eruptions may be divided into immunologically and nonimmunologically mediated reactions. Immunologically mediated reactions and nonimmunologically mediated reactions. Nonimmunologically mediated reactions may be classified according to the following features: accumulation, adverse effects, direct release of mast cell mediators. Idiosyncratic reactions are unpredictable and not explained by the pharmacologic properties of the drug.

LDE is a rare skin reaction that can be associated with several drugs. Drug eruptions occur in approximately 2-5% of inpatients and in greater than 1% of outpatients. Topical steroids such as clobetasol proprionate and betamethasone proprionate ointments are generally applied for 4 -6 week courses. Drug reactions are a common reason for litigation. Mild topical steroids (eg, hydrocortisone, desonide) and moisturizing lotions are also used, especially during the late desquamative phase. Therapy for exanthematous drug eruptions is supportive in nature. First-generation antihistamines are used 24 h/d. Other treatments include long term antibiotics, oral antifungal agents, phototherapy, acitretin, methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine.

Drug Eruptions Lichenoid - Prevention and Treatment Tips

1. Topical steroids such as clobetasol proprionate and betamethasone proprionate ointments also use.

2. Hydrocortisone foam can be use.

3. Steroid injections into affected areas may be useful for localised disease.

4. Systemic steroids may have serious side effects, so discuss this treatment with your dermatologist.

5. Other treatments include long term antibiotics, oral antifungal agents, phototherapy, acitretin, methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine.

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