The Plague of Plenty

By: Sandra Prior

A skyrocketing number of young men are being stricken with type 2 diabetes - a disease that could leave them blind, impotent, disabled and if left untreated, eventually death. The really scary part? You may have it and not even know it.

Evasive Manoeuvres

Getting type 2 diabetes is no accident. It's a head on collision that we steer our lives straight into. Consider this your defensive driving course.

Walk Off your Belly

The scientific name for your gut is 'visceral fat'. And the scientific way to lose it? Aerobic exercise, particularly walking, is one of the best ways to get rid of visceral fat. This cuts your risk of diabetes in half.

Eat the Right Carbs

Get to know the glycemic index of foods. Men who ate foods with a low glycemic index, like wholewheat bread are 40% less likely to develop diabetes as those who ate high glycemic index foods, like white bread and white rice. Also increase your soluble fiber foods like oats, oat bran, fruits and vegetables, legumes and soya.

Quit Smoking

Cigarettes are a multiplier of risks that should be avoided at all costs.

Are you Allowed to have Sugar?

Previously it was thought that sucrose (table sugar) caused blood glucose to increase more rapidly than other food products. Recent research has shown that sucrose produces a similar effect on blood glucose as bread, rice and potatoes. This does not mean that you can use sugar freely in the diet. What it does mean is that:

You can have sugar with high fiber meals. Eg, you can add two teaspoons of sugar to cereal or have a little jam on bread. Sugar added to certain products such as baked beans and wheatbix can be included safely in the diet. A moderate sugar intake makes it easier to have a diet higher in carbohydrate and lower in fat.

Alcohol

A person with well controlled diabetes can have limited amounts of alcohol. One can of beer a day and one glass of wine a day. Have at least 5 alcohol free days a week. Use sugar free mixers like diet cool drinks, soda/mineral water. Because alcohol can increase the risk of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels), always drink with a meal or snacks.

Alcohol is high in energy - avoid it if you are overweight. If you have raised triglyceride levels, avoid alcohol.

What to do when you are Sick

Any illness is likely to affect your blood glucose control. When you are sick:

Never stop taking your insulin or tablets.

Try to continue to eat normally, and try milky drinks, thick soups, ice cream, yoghurt, fruit juice, plain biscuits.

Avoid dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids. If blood glucose is high, drink sugar free drinks. If blood glucose is low drink sweetened drinks. Test blood glucose more often and get advice from your doctor if blood sugar is not normal.

What is Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia is when your blood glucose falls too low. Symptoms include trembling, sweating, weakness, headache, tingling lips or tongue, irritability or blurred vision. Hypoglycaemia can occur if your meals are delayed or missed, if the insulin dose is too high, after excessive exercise or drinking alcohol.

You need to treat hypoglycaemia immediately with either three glucose tablets or half a glass lucozade or sweet gassy cool drink or two teaspoons of sugar. Try to understand the reason for your hypoglycaemia so that you can prevent it from happening again. Consult your doctor or dietician if it happens often.

Alternative Remedies

While there are a number of therapies that enhance well being, remember that there is no cure for diabetes and any such claims must be rejected. It is most likely a scam to make you part with your money.

Herbs and Remedies that seem to Help with Diabetic Complications

Evening Primrose Oil

These fatty acids may help relieve the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy.

Chromium

This dietary supplement is often recommended for diabetics who are chromium deficient. A true deficiency in chromium has been shown to impair the use of glucose. Good sources of chromium are bran based breakfast cereals, liver, wholegrain breads and fruit and vegetables.

Nicotinamide or Vitamin B3 has been known to prolong what is called the honeymoon period. This is the time, shortly after diagnosis and the first insulin injection during which the pancreas seems to rejuvenate and starts producing insulin. Insulin needs are lower during this period.

Other elements often recommended to improve the body's use of glucose include carotene, found in orange and dark green leafy vegetables. Garlic, onion and fenugreek apparently modify the body's production of insulin.

Top Searches on
Medical Conditions
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Medical Conditions
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles