Nokia N95 is it the mobile phone god

By: Steve Morris

but a word of warning five mega pixels sounds impressive, and compared to most phones it is , the quality of the shots are good, but it won't replace a dedicated digital camera. The Nokia N95 features the same Web browser as is on the Nokia E62, with its smooth scrolling and mini-map navigation panel. The N95 features infrared, Bluetooth, GSM, HSDPA , a TFT display that supports 16 Million colours and has a resolution of 240 x 320 pixels. it features a unique dual slider, with one side a normal keypad and another layer devoted to music controls.

N95 Music Player

Other highlights of Nokia N95 are music player and 150 MB of internal memory. In many respects, the iPhone and the Nokia N95 are competitors. The Apple iPhone and the Nokia N95 are being positioned as mobile multimedia computers that do a variety of functions. I often ask myself how long it will be before the mobile phone becomes the desktop PC we foresee it becoming.

The Call management features on the Nokia N95 are the same as those found in other Nokia Series 60 smart phones so you can be sure that the quality will be to a high standard

Nokia N95 and GPS

The N95 has an integrated GPS system with has an accuracy of around 10m I have found this added technology lacking. There is a major problem getting a signal, the test area we were using was ?highly built up with lots of tall buildings. We only managed to pick up a stable signal in a ?high rise flat on the fifth floor pointing the device up side down at the sky ( the GPS antenna is in the bottom of the handset) it comes complete with a Map application aptly called Maps ?this has global overview maps built in. Maps that are more detailed can be downloaded for free from an online server. The detail available varies from country to country, but in many cases it is available down to street level. , point of interest is also included. All the maps are available free, as is basic route planning, but navigation functionality (with voice and on screen prompts) will be available as a pay-for add on.

Another disappointing thing about the N95 was the battery life its battery life leaves a lot to be desired. Several sources are reporting that the handset needs charging daily, and even if left switched-on and untouched it's very doubtful to last Nokia’s claimed 9.5 days on standby time.

All in all the N95 on paper is a great phone but there are a few things that let it down in the real world. The biggie is the length of time the battery lasts I understand that there's a lot under the hood and therefore you would expect it to drain power but quoting the standby time of 9.5 days and not living up to it, that’s sad. Secondly the GPS , what a great idea ?not having to spend out on a blue tooth GPS receiver to go with your phone but not being able to get a signal what's the point. Did the R&D guys rush through the testing of these features so they could get it to market quickly. If everything worked as promised then the N95 would be a leap in mobile phone technology but alas it doesn't . Its like getting a nice new sports car with a 1 gallon fuel tank , looks good drives fast but you got to keep filling it up .

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