The History of 3G Mobile Phones

By: Gary Parsons

Back in the year 2000; Mobile Networks were asked to bid on licences which would bring a new third generation technology to our mobile phones. It promised to bring truly multimedia capabilities to wireless networks, offering speeds of up to 2mb per second. The auction raised ?22.47bn within the UK but fears about networks having paid too much led to disappointing results in many other European countries.

The GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) technology does just what it says and is the most popular standard in the world. It is used by more than 212 countries and differs from previous standards; meaning that calling signals are of a digital quality and why it's considered a second generation (or 2G) technology. The idea behind 3G (or as you've guessed - third generation technology) is that further steps can be taken to include data signals and has become fairly successful, particularly in Europe.

Manufacturers of mobile phones spotted this progression in technology and worked tirelessly with networks to provide suitable phones which will make full use of the 3G. At first companies such as Motorola were releasing phones which were heavy in weight and didn't compete well with other phones on the market, despite their market leading features. Since then other manufacturers have worked and developed smaller phones to embrace this. One advantage of these newer phones is their cameras, making full use of their larger screens in the same way as digital cameras.

With the growing popularity of 3G technology, it seems only strange that Apple has chosen to exclude this feature from its US release. Many do however believe that it'd be foolish for Apple to release their phone within Europe and exclude these features, meaning that the UK could see and benefit from a much better iPhone than that given to its native country.

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