Cyborg Theory in Science and Arts

By: Andrew

The art world always supplied a venue through which various philosophies and ideas could be securely investigated whether the capability to event such ideas really existed or not. Mary Shelley's thought-provoking and very popular novel "Frankenstein" can be an illustration of this with its main character - a scientist, who tries to develop a gigantic creature created from different parts of human body which were found at local graveyards. as no one yet had distinguished what the might be a force that gives life and could reanimate material, all the same Mary Shelley wrote a heart-wrenching and convincing story inspecting the philosophic, psychological and scientific concepts concerned the idea of a machine and human combination.

This idea would later become well-known by the accepted term 'cyborg' and a word-phrase 'a cybernetic organism' that indicate some kind of organic/technologic grouping.
From its early study in Shelley's work, throughout the scientific peak of the technology revolution in 1960s in the modern and postmodern society, the theory of the cyborg constantly fascinated science fiction authors, philosophers and scientists. As it was explored and developed, firstly within the world of art, a great number of conceptions appeared regarding the relative limitations or benefits of a broad movement in the direction of a cyborg future. To understand these presentations completely, it is important to understand the various ideas that have made a great contribution to the cyborg concept before distinguishing its educative and entertaining influences on the public and its life values. The Otaku Movement emerged on order to illustrate the way the cyborg theory existing in the present society. Within this movement there are some favorite artists: Takashi Murakami and Mariko Mori.

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