New Study Claims Modern Cars Confusing Consumers

By: Abbi Rouse

Many Britons bewildered by the "fancy additions to today's vehicles" new research suggests.

Insurance services provider LV= claims that over a third (37 per cent) of people interviewed in a recent study admitted to not understanding the function of the fancy icons displayed on their dashboards. Furthermore, nearly three-quarters (74 per cent) of people said that they would be unable to fix their car in the event of a breakdown. An additional 47 per cent said that they had no understanding of how engines function, with just five per cent of respondents to the study believing their understanding of how a vehicle operates is excellent.

Britain it seems is a nation that relies on breakdown and repair services, with as few as 4 per cent of car owners confident they could repair their car if it broke down, while a further 18 per cent claimed the could carry out basic repairs without help.

For those looking to fund expensive repairs to their vehicle, a cheap personal loan may allow car-owners to get their vehicle back on the road quickly providing the extra cash flow needed to cover maintenance costs.

Confusion about the varied functions of today's vehicles were said to be compounded by a multitude of acronyms used to describe already obscure features.

More than a quarter (28 per cent), said that they were unaware that the acronym MPV stood for multi person vehicle, while 63 per cent of respondents were found to hold the false belief that FWD stands for four wheel drive. In fact, the term is used to denote front wheel drive vehicles.

The LV= report also examined male and female perceptions to their own understanding of how vehicles work, with men said to be reluctant to admit their bafflement at the complexities of modern cars, the company states. Despite not knowing how to undertake basic repairs or fix their cars in the event of a breakdown, 71 per cent of men said that their understanding of automobiles was average or above. Only one in ten men admitted to knowing nothing about modern cars, compared to 30 per cent of women.

Emma Holyer, spokesperson for breakdown service Britannia Rescue, said: "There is little doubt that innovation has made driving a far more pleasurable experience, but it has made part-time weekend mechanics a thing of the past. With many cars relying on complex electronics or technology, many problems now require specialist equipment, as well as specialist knowledge, to get the problem fixed. Which makes it even more important for motorists to take out breakdown cover, at least they can then get back on the road quickly and easily in the event of a breakdown."

The research follows reports last month by motor services group the AA suggesting that car insurance costs are becoming an increasingly prohibitive item of expenditure for many UK vehicle owners. Citing statistics from MoneyExpertScience Articles, the group states that the average annual insurance policy costs 629 pounds and four pence. A personal loan quote may be advisable for those looking to fund the additional costs of keeping a car on the road.

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