Used Boats

By: Thomas Morva

The one benefit of purchasing a used boat is that it will come cheaper than a new one, and is generally better equipped. Added to that, a used boat has a proven track record. On the downside, upgrading a used boat will eventually cost you money.

If you choose to purchase a used boat, there are many ways to go about it. Shopping can be done through classified advertisements in the newspapers, journals, magazines and on a plethora of websites relating to boats. Also, dealerships offer boats that have been accepted as trade-ins. The warranty offered on the used boat would be limited, and the boat will most likely have gone through some servicing to get it ready for sale. The dealer, being a third party with obvious overhead costs (for example, sales commissions), would put a higher price on the used boat than the owner of the boat would.

The prudent thing to do, upon finding a boat that suits your taste, is to call the U.S. Coast Guard and get the requisite information on that particular model. If a recall has been issued, then you should call the owner to find out if the boat has been serviced. If the answer is in the negative, you should find out if the recall period is still on.

After the necessary research, the boat would then have to be thoroughly inspected. The engine is the major concern in a used boat. A boat's engine goes through a lot more wear and tear than a car's, so you have to check the condition of the boat engine in detail. If you are a mechanical novice, a technician should check on the condition of the engine before you purchase the boat. This is particularly important if the boat has been used extensively in salt water, which has a greater corrosive effect than fresh water.

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