Silver Lining For Retirees In 2008

By: Tom_dawson
Those Britons due to retire next year are on track to enjoy a bright financial future, according to new research.

In a study carried out by Prudential, the average age of those consumers retiring in 2008 will be 60 and 58 for men and women respectively. Findings from the company also indicated that a quarter of people retiring early next year will do so because they can afford to. Meanwhile, 22 per cent are stopping work because they have reached the statutory age for retirement. However, as the actual statutory ages for giving up work are 65 and 60 for women respectively, such people appear to have got their finances in a strong enough shape that they have managed to save enough money for retirement as well as meeting other demands on their spending such as personal loans and utility bills.

The research also showed that 33 per cent of women retiring next year will be over the age of 60, while just over one in ten men (11 per cent) will be more than 65. Meanwhile, the majority (52 per cent) of people retiring in 2008 are on a final salary scheme, as 22 per cent are on a defined contribution policy.

Commenting on the findings, Ali Crossley, director of retirement insurance for Prudential, reported that although those stopping work next year should be able to manage their money adequately, those retiring after 2008 may find that they develop financial problems. He stated: "People retiring next year are in general entitled to think 'What pensions crisis?'. On average they are giving up work early and can look forward to final salary schemes having worked hard throughout their lives. That is good news which is not often a phrase associated with pensions. However every silver lining has a cloud and with pensions it is never hard to find another side. Those of us coming after the class of 2008 will perhaps not be so lucky unless we take action to plan for retirement."

However, the firm warned that the divide between the "haves and the have-nots" is growing wider as about a quarter of Britons do not have any money saved into a pension scheme. In turn this could lead many people to develop financial difficulties in later life as they struggle to meet demands for payment on areas such as mortgages, credit card bills, loans and overdrafts. In addition, Prudential pointed out that some 80 per cent of final salary schemes are now closed to new members.

As a result, those looking to free up more money to put into pension accounts so as to secure a certain standard of living for when they retire may wish to consider getting a debt consolidation loan. An application for such borrowing could well allow consumers to meet numerous demands for payments at once and be left with a single low-rate loan. Taking out a consolidation loan could be particularly advisable after a recent study by Alliance & Leicester indicates that 3.4 million Britons see their financial situation as the largest concern in their life. Meanwhile, about half of people become worried about money in the approach to the Christmas and new year period.
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