Chapter 7 Or 13 on Personal Bankruptcy

By: Scott Goodman

Bankruptcy laws in the United States are made to ensure the interests of the borrower are safeguarded, and are formed by the federal government and addressed accordingly by various US Bankruptcy Courts, and it is believed that each year as many as one million Americans go bankrupt and are found filing for bankruptcy. Most of these individuals that file for bankruptcy do so under different personal bankruptcy laws that include chapter thirteen and also chapter 7, and in a few instances, they can even qualify for chapter twelve, especially if they are anglers or farmers and business is owned by the family.

Filing Under Chapter Seven

You can file personal bankruptcy and at the same time do so under chapter seven in which case it is necessary for you to provide a list of all your assets to the court and also have to assign a trustee who will liquidate items in order to pay off creditors. Furthermore, filing personal bankruptcy is allowed once in seven years and the cost of filing personal bankruptcy is approximately three hundred dollars which goes towards filing fee.

If you plan on filing personal bankruptcy under chapter thirteen, it will help in reducing your debt though unlike chapter seven, does not cancel out your debt. And, chapter thirteen personal bankruptcies also means having to set out a plan for repayment with creditors and courts and assigning trustee who will make monthly payments after paying them the money. The trustee will receive payments from you and apportion them to various creditors, and an advantage to using chapter thirteen for filing personal bankruptcy is that unlike in chapter seven, under this chapter you may hold on to everything that would have been lost under chapter seven.

However, both these types of personal bankruptcy allows the debtor to rid him or herself of debts, though remember when filing chapter thirteen bankruptcy, you need to have debt that is not more than two hundred fifty thousand dollars and that such debt is unsecured, while debts that are secured should not exceed seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars.

The bottom line is that before filing for personal bankruptcy, makes sure to know what the ramifications of different chapters are and in most instances it may be better to file for chapter thirteen instead of chapter seven as the latter shows that you are a person that does not pay your debts.

Bankruptcy
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Bankruptcy
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles