Mallin Rouge: the Shopping Blitz

By: Olivia Hunt

In malls, the major activity that is performed by the people is shopping. In Bowlby's article, shopping is defined as a consumption-oriented movement in a space where one has the possibility of making purchases. Shopping has something to do with buying, but which also gives space to plain daydreaming and planning of future purchases. In other words, shopping doesn't strictly imply purchase activities alone. Mall displays are effective in attracting the attention of the shoppers...but not to the point that the displays will lead the customers to buy a product.
Bowlby suggested two other ways of understanding shopping: either as a recreation or a chore. Shopping as a recreation connotes an open-minded wandering in malls, shops and stores. The shopper doesn't need to have any precise plans or destinations.

In this case, shopping suggests something that is pleasurable, and possibly transgressive and excessive: someone may spend too much time or too much money. In other words, a shopper just enjoys himself/herself. Conversely, shopping as a chore implies more of an obligation or a regular necessary routine for survival like food shopping. It is planned and limited in terms of money and time. Everything should be budgeted.
In some societies, spending out of money as quickly as possible is an act which demonstrates one's commitment to a network of peers with an ethos of generalized reciprocity and maximum sociability. They feel that spending their money is exhausting and exhilarating, but at the same time relaxing.
Window-shopping, on the other hand, is one example of anxiety-producing shopping experience, according to some of the Trinidadian interviewees. One of the tasks that the shoppers engage in order to abridge their shopping activity is making a list. This makes the expedition faster, without forgetting anything needed at home. Preparing a list is also beneficial for those with tight budgets. Window-shopping limits the buyer only to those products that are needed and makes him refrain him/her from "impulse buying." But making a list also has its own negative points. It limits the shopper only to those products he/she is used to buy and closes the chances for alternatives and additional suggestions.

Shopping
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Shopping