Understanding Adult Teenage and Baby Acne

By: Trevor Mulholland

Having enough knowledge about adult teenage and baby acne will make you better prepared in dealing with these conditions. Knowing more about them will also help alleviate confusion and avoid fear. The good thing about all this is that all of these conditions can be easily remedied; all you need is a bit of information and a consultation with your dermatologist.

Adult teenage and baby acne have differing characteristics. To improve your knowledge about each condition, read on.

Adult pimples
There are more women than men who suffer from adult acne. The reason for this is not yet established, but the fact that hormones have a lot to do with pimples made some skin experts conclude that pregnancy, menopause and menstruation might have something to do with it. According to some studies, women are more prone to hormonal imbalance; hence they are more likely to suffer from adult acne. A number of research have also speculated that stress is another major culprit since surveys have revealed that successful adults, or those who have a lot of responsibilities and therefore under a lot of stress, are the ones who are more likely to suffer from adult acne.

Teenage acne
Teenagers comprise the largest population who suffer from acne among all the age groups. This is explained by the onset of puberty, the period in a human's life when the body starts producing androgens. Although teenage boys are more likely to suffer from pimples than girls, it is the women who are likely to carry the condition to their adulthood. While some will leave their pimples behind once they reach their 20s, others might continue to suffer from this condition even when they are already in their 40s. Whatever the case might be, adolescent zits should be addressed, primarily because teenagers are the most likely to suffer from insecurities caused by a less-than-perfect physical appearance.

Baby acne
Also known as acne neonatorum, baby acne affects an estimated 25 percent of newborn infants. Papules usually appear on babies' cheeks, but can also be found in their backs and necks. Baby acne is caused by the higher-than-normal activity of the baby's sebaceous glands. This is induced by the maternal hormones that pass through the placenta and remain with the baby even after delivery. In most cases, the acne disappears after a couple of weeks to a month. Some though, persists for a few months. Baby acne should not be confused with milia or the tiny bumps that can appear on the baby's skin right after delivery. Milia or milk spots also disappear after a few weeks. They have a bump-like appearance as opposed to baby acne which is usually reddish and looks like common skin lesions.

Adult teenage and baby acne have their own characteristics and their own remedies. Knowing the reason behind their occurrence and understanding the mechanism behind them will give a person a better chance of finding the appropriate cure for each condition.

Acne
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