VoIP : Outpaced the Phones?

By: Dennis Jaylon

In today's times, if you have an internet connection, you do not have to pay anything extra for your calling anywhere around the world. This is so because by using the VoIP software, you can use your internet connection to place free long-distance phone calls. This process works by using the available software to make phone calls over the Internet.

This technology has actually been around since quite a time; however, with broadband hi-speed high-speed internet connection, long-distance calling concept has benefited a lot.

There are basically three ways in which VoIP is used these days:
1. ATA: (Analog Telephone Adaptor) is the most common way, which allows phone connection with the internet.
2. IP Phones have an Ethernet connector which gets directly plugged into your router (instead of the usual jack connector that other phones have.) Being in-built, no extra software needs to be installed.
3. Computer-to-Computer: is the simplest and the cheapest way to make computer-to-computer calls. These calls are entirely free. All you need is the software which can be found for free on the internet, a good internet connection, a microphone, speakers, and a sound card. All you pay here is your monthly internet service charges.

Big companies have found a more economical use of this technology for their bigger requirements. This includes conducting all their calls within their international branches through a VoIP network. Using this to route international calls, they thus get away with these calls at local rates.

Today, with this technology, you can make a call anywhere that you have a broadband connection. This means freedom and the facility to make calls from home, or anywhere else where you carry your phone or your computer.

Other benefits as provided by some service providers is the ability to check your voicemail via your e-mail. And also can you attach voice messages to your e-mails.

Seems like VoIP has truly outpaced the traditional telephones.

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