Information About LG Voyager Vx10000

By: Corwin Brown

The LG Voyager's mission is to unseat the iPhone as the hottest touchscreen handset out there. It addresses many complaints about Apple's controversy magnet and has many of the same goodies, including an email client and a music player. And although the Voyager's touchscreen interface isn't as slick as the iPhone's, features like stereo Bluetooth, GPS, video recording, a spacious QWERTY keyboard, and mobile TV support actually give it an edge. Limited video support, lack of WiFi, and inadequate contacts and calendar syncing may keep it from stealing too much thunder from the iPhone, but we still think the Voyager is something to call home about, especially if you're committed to sticking with Verizon.

Physical Aspects

The physical design of the LG Voyager is the cause of much of the attention that the device has received. While neither light nor small, at 140g (4.9oz) and 118mm x 54mm x 19mm (4.6" x 2.1" x .73"), the Voyager still garners attention due to its large external touchscreen display and its communicator style clamshell hinge that hides a large non-touch display and full QWERTY keyboard within. It is, for the most part, the best of both worlds, offering some iPhone like finger touch wizardry while at the same time being a very practical platform for messaging and other text related functions.

Design
From the outset, the LG Voyager VX10000 looks more like the iPhone than it does its VX9800 and enV predecessors. Gone are the exterior keypad and tiny external display; instead you're greeted by a vibrant touch screen that dominates the front face of the Voyager. As you'd expect from a messaging phone, the Voyager is rather bulky. At 4.64 by 2.12 by 0.71 inches, the Voyager is exactly as tall as the enV, but it's also a bit wider when measured across the front face. Though the change from the VX9900 is noticeable, the Voyager manages to pack its keyboard as well as a long list of features into a trim profile that's a quarter of an inch trimmer than its forerunner's.

Think of the LG Voyager less as a would-be iPhone killer and more as what the latest Sidekicks should have been--a solid messaging device with first-class multimedia features. Although the touchscreen could have been better implemented and the Web browser is a bit slow, we like the versatility of having both touch- and keyboard-based input

Surfing the Web on the Voyager was a mixed bag. When you open the Browser, you'll see a VZW homepage with a menu of eight options that includes News, Sports, Weather, Entertainment, Optimized Web, and Connect. Connect brings up quick links to Yahoo Mail, Windows Live, Gmail, and AOL Mail, as well as Facebook. Optimized Web attempts to format HTML pages for this device, and in general it did a pretty good job displaying content in one easy-to-read column.

One look at the Voyager and you'll get LG's message loud and clear: "suck it, iPhone!" From the large 2.8-inch, 400 x 240-pixel touchscreen to the icon-based user interface, the Voyager so readily resembles Apple's wundergizmo, that you might try activating it with iTunes. Okay, it doesn't work that way, but it does give the iPhone a legitimate run for its money.

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