How to Write Persuasive Copy for Company Brochures

By: Laurence James
When it comes to selling your products and services, many companiesmiss a trick when it comes to writing the copy for promotionalbrochures. This is because many businesses pack their glossy,well-produced brochure with just the key features of their latestoffers and new solutions, without actually selling the benefits of whatit is they're offering. Far from getting inside the client's mind andthinking about what they need, most company brochures make the fatalmistake of ‘focusing on information instead of persuasion' (1).

Abrochure is a sales document. It must present the reader with acompelling solution to their specific needs in a clear and consistentvoice, using language they will find appealing. The tone of the copyshouldn't be focused on your own company, but on the customer and theirrequirements. You should also be clear on where the brochure sitswithin your marketing mix, and adjust the tone accordingly. Forexample, is it designed to close the deal or sell a meeting? It'simportant to think about who will be reading it and what you want themto do next.

Once you've established your market, key benefitsand required tone of voice, you need to consider the structure of yourbrochure. It's useful to work with the designer on this part of theprocess, so you can coordinate the length of copy needed and whatsections it will be divided into. You can ‘bolt on' copy into a design,but it's better to work on the two in tandem as the results will appearmore cohesive. At this stage, it's also crucial to consider how yourcopy fits with the images and graphics you're using. If chosencarefully, your images will speak for themselves in conveying your keymessages, and you can write the words to complement them.

Thecaptions you use to accompany pictures and graphics are also veryimportant. Most people remember these over and above anything else inyour brochure, so use them as a chance to sell your services in apositive way. One last point on graphics, confine technical informationsuch as charts, graphs etc to their own section - don't break upflowing and persuasive copy with badly placed graphics. Such detailedcharts and graphs are important for creating credibility, but only ifused in the right way.

Throughout your brochure copy, rememberto keep referring back to the needs of your customer, highlighting thebenefits of every feature you mention. Make your section titles emotiveand attention grabbing too. If you also establish possible objectionsthat might exist in the reader's mind - and deal with these questions -your copy will be even more persuasive. If you speak to the targetaudience in the right tone of voice, establish credibility (usingrelevant testimonials if they complement your message), and createenticing, page turning reasons for buying your products and services,then your readers will feel compelled to act.

The final part ofthe process, therefore, is prompting your customers to actually ‘do'something with the persuasive copy you've put before them. A point alsofrequently missed in many company brochures. A strong ‘call to action'is essential if you don't want all your hard work to go to waste. Ifyou want the client to meet you, then ask them. Equally, if you wantthe customer to place an order, tell them to order now and give themseveral options on how to do it.

If you take some time tounderstand your customer's requirements, and structure your copywritingto meet these needs in a coherent and persuasive way, (always sellingbenefits not features), then your next company brochure will achievethe really positive results you are hoping for.

Sources

1. John Kuraoka, ‘How to write a brochure: advice from an advertising copywriter', 2006.

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