Effects Of Bad Credit Reports

By: Thomas Morva

Before analyzing what the effects of a bad credit report could amount to, it is important to understand the concept of a credit report. A credit report is in itself a compilation of your credit history, prepared by the three main Credit Reporting Agencies (CRAs): Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. The inputs for the reports can come from the creditors who have granted you loans, such as banks, hospitals, landlords, etc.

You may have been late in clearing your medical expenses bills, or have not paid your rent on time. Then there can be a situation when you overdraw on your bank account or did not make your credit card payment on time. In these cases, the hospital, landlord, and the bank would report this information to any of the three CRAs. What you would be left with is a credit report with negative errors on it. Having analyzed the reasons for a bad credit report, it would be useful to study the effects also.

If you wish to buy insurance policies, such as health, life, or dental, you will have to pay higher premiums than otherwise required. If you are an employee in a company, it becomes all the more imperative that your credit report is error-free. This is because many employers do a regular check of the credit histories of their employees. A negative report could prove instrumental in preventing your promotion.

For applicants, also, a negative credit report is a bad news, because it can prevent your getting a job you so desire. A negative credit report could also mean that you are unable to get loans for any major purchases, and even if you do get those, chances are that you would have to pay a higher interest rate.

Keeping this mind, it is important that your credit report should be error free. This is because in all situations inquiries will be made for your applications either for employment or for loans. So the best thing is to manage your finances accurately and judiciously.

Credit Matters
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Credit Matters