How to Repair Bad Credit - Dont Pay for Credit Repair Services

By: IC

Credit can be a sore subject, especially when a person's credit history is continually blemished by late payments and delinquent accounts. Some people would rather just ignore their credit history, but the reality of the matter is that there are often times when a credit score will be checked for more than just obtaining credit; employers, potential landlords, and insurance companies all utilize credit histories to predict a person's reliability and trustworthiness.

For persons who simply close their eyes to their bad credit, there comes a time when they must make an effort to repair it. It may be tempting to simply pay a credit repair service to take care of the repair instead of personally engaging in the task. After all, there is an abundant pool of credit repair companies to choose from, and many consumers feel overwhelmed at the prospect of attempting to take care of repairing their credit themselves. Some consumers may not even realize that they can take care of the repair without assistance from a professional company. Rest assured, it can be done, and in all likelihood a person can do it better than a company would.

There are two different types of credit repair services: consumer credit counselling services (CCCS) and "We'll Fix Your Credit" type companies. Despite CCCS being a much more reliable alternative to the other alternative, there are several credit counselling services who take advantage of the non-profit status afforded by the government to swindle desperate people out of money. Stories abound of payments being made late or not at all and of ludicrous fees eating up consumers' money. A sound counselling service will not charge for using the service, as it is creditors who make these sorts of programmes possible. Creditors love these types of services even though they generally require lower interest rates and forgiveness of some fees, because they prefer a consumer who pays off a delinquent balance bit by bit with the aid of a company rather than not paying off the balance at all.

Those companies who advertise so prevalently, claiming to be able to erase bad debt from credit effortlessly yet for a fee, are best shunned. These companies may indeed get negative items removed from credit reports, but the outcome is only short-term. By the time the consumer realise the debt is back on their report the company is long gone with their money.

Perhaps the best way to repair credit is to do it yourself. Those same collectors, who call at all hours, insisting on payments and usually being rude, will mellow down if you are suddenly willing to cooperate. The next time one calls don't hang up or yell at them for hounding you. Instead, explain to the collector that you are aware that you owe the money and you are going to pay and tell them a realistic amount that you can pay back monthly.

You may be astonished to discover that an amount as small as 10 dollars a month can ward off the collectors. Some financial experts even suggest sending a copy of your budget to the collector to show them that you aren't kidding when you say you only can spare a few dollars. This proves to the collections company that you're serious, and they may stop the phone calls. Even if the manageable payments are minute in comparison to the balance owed, it is legions better than ignoring the problem. After all, you did incur this debt, and it is your responsibility to pay.

If at all possible, contact the company prior to your accounts going bad. If you know you are going to have problems paying your bills this month there is nothing wrong with calling up your lenders and requesting what is called a "skip pay." This means you skip making a payment one month, without penalty, in an effort to stay afloat. That may be just what you need to get your monetary affairs back in order. Keep in touch with your creditors, try to pay your bills promptly, and stay devoted. Why pay for something that you can do on your own?

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