Modern Day Gold Rush Crime

By: 10x Marketing

Go to Bannock City, Montana for a feel of gold rush ghosts. It is what they call a ghost town, abandoned after the gold was sucked out of the soil by pioneers in the 1860s. How would gold rush criminals survive in today's world? They would need a laptop, for starters.
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Let's transport a famous criminal from the Old West and see how he would fare in today's world of crime. Henry Plummer, Bannock's sheriff, secretly led a gang that robbed banks and killed hundreds of people, all while posing as a good-looking guy with a sheriff badge. Henry hoarded bags of gold in his log cabin until one day the locals wised up and decided to hang him. He was nearly thirty years old when he died. You can see his gallows still standing today. While you are looking at it don't forget to watch your feet for pesky rattlesnakes.
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Putting Henry in 2008, we'll start by replacing his cowboy hat and bandana with geeky glasses and a pin stripe suit. We'll make him an investment banker by day, bank robber by night. How could he rob a bank at night, you say. Because bank robbers of today (the smart ones) are hackers who infiltrate the bank's software. The banks of today do not have large bins of cash in the back, protected by a simple combination lock like the banks of Bannock.

So a robber entering a bank demanding immediate cash, in large amounts, would be in sore luck, faced with mostly "digital cash."
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What would Henry do first? Besides learning how to drive a car and run modern day faucets, Henry is up against some stiff bank security. Banks must be vigilant in protecting their customer's financial information, because one sour case of robbery and the bank's credibility would suffer. The bigger the bank, the heftier the protection. Banks are one field of business that must stay on the cutting edge of technology, because they cannot let the hackers get ahead of them.
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Look at the technology banks have today. Put Henry in a modern day bank and he would be more confused than a horse in the middle of New York City. Just the technology for processing bank loans could involve several pieces of software, from the business rule engine to the pricing network to the pricing engine. High security and complex codes for each system are mandatory. Henry would be confronted with code after code after password. Not to mention the high-tech security systems that would prevent him from entering the bank in the first place.
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However, Henry would probably rob the bank from a remote location, like from his home while he fries eggs and bacon on the griddle. He would try to hack the website. Just the business rule engine alone might deter him, a highly complex and secure system for determining customer credibility. Henry might give up on breaking into the bank's software, and try to go a more common route -stealing from the customer directly.
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Most bank fraud today involves scams where the customer is duped into giving over large sums of cash. I fell victim to one scam, and was very close to forking over cash to a mysterious man named Ahmed who asked that I teach his son German last summer. He said he would pay me double the amount I usually get, if only I would help him transfer some money to his friend's bank in Toronto. Luckily, my suspicions held me back from losing any money.
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Henry might adapt and learn the ways of modern day bank robbers, but banks are ready with big guns of highly secure technology. And if you lose all your money, you could always sell your house and live with the ghosts of Bannock.

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