How to Remove a Foreclosure From your Credit Report

By: Chane Steiner

A foreclosure can be reported on your credit report for 7 years and should be avoided at all costs. A foreclosure can be devastating to your credit scores. If you have a foreclosure on your record, credit repair should be one of the very first things you look into. A foreclosure can be deleted from your credit report just like any other negative account, but you must know what you are dealing with or you could actually make matters worse.

If you would like to remove a foreclosure from your credit report, you will first want to learn about your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act and all other laws having to do with foreclosures and credit reporting. The better you understand your rights, the easier it will be to have your foreclosure removed from your credit report.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) allows a consumer to challenge any information on his credit report, including a foreclosure, on the basis of "completeness and accuracy." If, after a reinvestigation by the credit bureau, the disputed information "is found to be inaccurate or can no longer be verified, the credit bureau must promptly delete such information."

The credit bureaus are required to complete the investigation within 30 days.

Most people would claim that they don't have the time or resources to commit to learning about the laws and their rights, but it's very important to know your civil and consumer rights. If you don't have the time you may want to seek legal help and/or consult with a credit repair company.

Credit repair professionals specialize in removing foreclosures and other negative items from your credit reports. They focus on correcting inaccurate and erroneous information on your credit report. If a negative item on your credit report is disputed and can not be verified by the creditor or contains any kind of inaccurate information it must be legally be corrected and/or removed from your report immediately.

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