Understanding The Credit Score Rating Scale

By: Williamblake
No doubt about it, credit score rating scales are confusing. Working through all the numbers can leave you wondering what it all means. Understanding ratings and how they work will help you to read and understand your credit score more easily.

Companies review various data when building your credit score. Here are just a few:

- Past Payment History - Timing of Bill Payments - Outstanding Debt - Credit History

If you have a great deal of debt or you don't have a very long credit history, you will receive a lower credit score even if there are no "black marks" against you.

Recently, credit applications take your credit score into consideration. Applying often for credit by filling out store applications for credit cards will cause you to receive a lower score. High amounts of credit card debt at high interest rates will do the same damage.

700 or higher is considered to be a good credit score. Being awarded credit at low interest rates should not be a problem if you have a score of 700 or higher.

If your score is between 450 and 650, it indicates that your credit needs some work to improve it. At this level you'll likely have a harder time finding a loan or qualifying for a credit card without some type of security. You will also likely be paying a higher interest rate because you are considered a higher risk.

If your score is below 450, your credit is in need of some serious help. At this level you likely won't be able to qualify for a loan or credit card until you pursue some form of credit counseling to improve your score.

To improve your rating, check out the many sources that can assist you. Credit counseling services are available online as well as in the telephone book and many offer their services for free. Assessment of your financial situation is available and advice to improve your credit score will likely move you toward your goal of a higher credit score.
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