Renting An Apartment With Bad Credit

By: Liz Roberts

Not too many people realize the damaging effects of having a bad credit until they're stuck in the actual situation. For instance, renting an apartment can be a big challenge for those with bad credit. If you think your credit report would not be questioned by a landlord, you're mistaken. Apartment owners often check on an individual's credit report before accepting him as tenant.

Does bad credit mean you can't rent an apartment? Fortunately not! If you need a place to rent, there are still many options available to you. Here are few tips on how to get the apartment that you want regardless of bad credit.

Look for apartments that do not have strict policies on credit. Use the internet to search for apartments that do not have a credit check policy. You may also look at the classified ads of your local newspaper to find home rentals, condos or apartments that are more lenient in accepting tenants. If you know some real estate agents, they might also know some properties for rent who do not necessarily check on a person's credit.

Get recommendations from reputable people. You may get recommendations from your bank, lawyer, employer, or former landlords as a proof of your credibility. The letter should state why your credit history has been tainted. If you've been through a difficult situation, you can try to appeal with the landlord's consideration.

Seek a co-signer.
If you have a friend or a relative with excellent credit, you can seek their help to vouch for your credibility. Remember, having a co-signer means your co-signer will be held accountable to pay for your debts in case you default on your lease. If you're going get a co-signer, make sure that he understands this condition before signing the agreement. In addition, respect your co-signer's good will and make sure that you do not cause any problems for your co-signer's credit.

Offer a bigger security deposit.
Expect that you need to put down a bigger upfront payment to make up for the absence of your credit. A higher deposit would give your landlord more security if he's worried about the possibility of defaults. Some landlords have asked for up to 6 months in advance from renters that not only have bad credit, but have a history of being evicted from prior lodgings. If your landlord ask for such a hefty deposit, try to work out a payment program, Its not unheard that they will take 3 months down and allow you to pay the additional security over a certain agreed upon time period. Make sure you can make these payments, defaulting on these side agreements can mean immediate eviction.

Clearly, not having good credit to back you up does have its consequences. If you know that you have a bad credit problem, the best thing to do is try to improve your credit even before you start looking for a new place.

If you have unpaid debts with a creditor, pay it in full and request that a letter from your creditor stating that you have already settled the accounts reflected in your credit report. Better yet, if you know that you'll be moving out soon, do all the necessary steps to settle your debts and make sure that your payments are properly reported to the credit bureaus. Do your best to boost your credit rating as early as possible so you can have more freedom in choosing the apartment you want.

Credit Matters
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