What Does your Credit History Look Like?

By: Cornie Herring

If you have ever taken out a loan, used a credit card or taken advantage of a "buy now, pay later" offer, you will have a credit history. Whenever a financial institution, such as a bank, a credit card company, or any other business gives you credit, it may send information about whether or not you make your payments on time to a credit-reporting agency.

It is important to get a copy of your credit history. You may think your credit history is perfect because you have never been late or missed any of your loan payment, but recent studies have shown that perhaps as many as 50% of all credit histories have errors in them. And these errors could be a problem for you.

Today, you credit history is used as a measuring tool more than simply applying for a loan. Statistic shows that 92% of insurers are using credit history to predicting potential losses and apply appropriate rate for their customers. A potential employer, especially financial industry may want to review your credit history before they offer you any of their job positions. With tight rental market in many metropolitan areas, landlords want to see prospective tenant's credit histories. Whether you are going to be able to pay the rent of not is foremost on their minds.

Your credit report contains information about your past and present personal and financial situation. Credit cards that never been formally cancelled will appeared on your credit history as an open line of credit. Beside that, credit-related court judgment against you in a lawsuit such as bankruptcy, if any will be recorded in your credit report and follow you as your credit history for many years. If you have any delay or unpaid debts, they will be appeared in your credit report. These can potentially cause problems because, if you are applying for a loan such as a college loan, a home mortgage or job application, they will be entered into the credit formula as debt and affect your credit ratings. Bad credit ratings prevent you from getting the best offer in term of best interest rate, approve with higher loan amount, or getting hire in your job application.

Hence, your pass credit records are important to you and if you have a good record, make sure that they appeared correctly in your credit history as you should be. There are three major reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian and Trans-Union, and they do not share information with each other, so you need to check your history from all three agencies. If you find errors, you can write to the agencies explaining the error, and they have 30 days to correct the error. You will want to check your report again after you have sent the corrections to be sure the changes were made.

In summary, it is your responsibility to ensure that your credit report is displaying your actual credit history. Take your initiative to confirm the correctness of you credit report so that you won't face any problem when come to the time you want to use it for any purpose.

Credit Matters
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