Seven Secrets to Spotting Phony Resumes

By: David Osborne

Phony resumes are dangerous for your health!

A hospital in America recently was found negligent in hiring a kidney transplant coordinator who was unskilled in reading medical charts. As a result, a patient was given a transplant of a cancerous kidney, which resulted in his death.

Only in America I hear you say, well perhaps not. Hughes and Jowitt (1996) reveal that over 37% of resumes are phony, over 85% of University graduates have admitted cheating whilst at University, and one third of all higher education qualifications are false especially PhD's.

So here are seven secrets to spotting phony resumes and eliminating deceitful duds from infiltrating your business:

1. Ensure applicants who say they have degrees, provide a description of the degree.

2. Ask candidates "who were some of the lecturers who taught them" and then check with the University.

3. Words like, "more than", and "over" suggest the applicant is exaggerating.

4. Ensure the applicant is very clear on the achievements they suggest are theirs, and if possible narrow them down to numbers, dates and actual figures, so you can undertake a very precise check on their claims.

5. If someone has been reassigned or their work has been reorganised, then there may well be a deeper darker implication behind the use of these words.

6. Other words that should trigger suspicious interest are, conceived, managed, and implemented.

7. A resume that states, self employed, family owned business, employer, who is now out of work and looking for a job, often signals employment issues that should be investigated.

A Microsoft survey of 38000 employees in 2006 suggested that 50% of employees believed they are in the wrong job and just biding their time until they find another job.

As a manager or business owner, what would the impact be on your business if you had this type an employee or employees in your business?

The moral of the story is, vet the resumes thoroughly and don't be a negligent hirer.

(1) Hughes, T. and Jowitt, M. (1996) 'Managing people - recruitment, selection and induction', McGraw Hill Australia p 88

David Osborne is a recruitment and performance management expert.

http://www.profitablepersonnel.com/freereport/

Human Resources
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