How To Leverage Your Ebook Income

By: Brian Hack

A common product to many marketing offers is an ebook, but not all ebooks are created equal. Once an ebook is written it can be sold or given away to promote another product or product line. Content can be written by you, or written by a ghostwriter for you, or you can purchase private label rights [PLR] on an existing ebook that you can modify, re-title and re-brand.

Ebooks are a good way to add value to a promotion. If you have written a new ebook then you can pick up some PLR ebooks to complement and increase the value of your offer.

Many of the ebooks bundled with promotions deliver content in ways that leave room for significant improvement. For example, some of the obvious features of a book are table of contents, headers or footers with page numbers, chapters with titles and sometimes sub-titles. If any of these hallmarks are missing from an ebook, then it can be improved.

If your product is too short to include the main traits of a book listed above, the terms booklet, report, or special report can be just as effective for promotion. Conversely, you can abstract content from PLR books or articles to supplement your project.

Although professional software and its use are essential to competitive advantage, it is not that expensive to hire a professional to package for you. Both money and time can be saved with a bit of planning to optimize your ebook profit potential. For the same price of some ebooks, you can purchase your own ebook income generator package from h4h.biz. The difference is how and how much money is returned to you on your investment.

As a professional packager I am always upgrading my software and skills. Like anyone who wants to earn income, there is a learning curve to the tools of the trade. On the internet, it includes the hardware, software, and skills in their use that determines how well your business performs in your market niche or sub-niche. Although software is a common denominator, how it is used is as different as the people using it.

There are a many good reasons to hire someone else to do a job better, sooner, or just get it done. For example, I am not a bookkeeper but I do have the same software as my bookkeeper. I know enough about using it to generate reports, but the rest I pay her to do. On the other hand, I'm a graphics specialist that uses most of the professional software on a daily basis. I manage my projects by sub-contracting surplus work to freelancers. This enables me to do as much work that comes my way while managing continual development of my business systems.
In my experience it is important to learn as much as you feel comfortable with about the tools of the trade because even if you don't use them on a daily basis yourself, you place yourself in the position of being a well informed buyer that understands enough of the technical jargon to make an informed purchase.

When I taught at the Pre-Press Institute, I would break the learning curve into lecture, lab, and experience. The lecture was a combination of reading to prepare, then watching and interacting in a demonstration. The lab time was spent learning how to do-it-yourself with immediate feedback to questions as they were asked. I explained experience as the combination of learning to learn, practice without the lab feedback, and on-the-job feedback from colleagues or clients. I have adapted many features of this training model for internet delivery. It is now available by membership to my online project workspace. It is just a few clicks away.

The next part of this article is titled "7 Ways To Increase Ebook Income Potential", and is available by subscription to my free weekly Business Builder Report.

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