Writing A Resume: Tips For Your Success

By: Jill Brennan

Let's be honest - nobody loves writing a resume, especially their own!? It's frustrating to string together all of those life "episodes" in a way that makes sense for the direction in which we are now heading. Then there are those questions we ask ourselves that distract us from the whole point of the resume, like: "How much personal information should I include? How can I make mine stand out from other resumes? Should I include a photo?" It is so easy to get tangled up in the details of your entire life that you forget that, while the resume is a factual document, it is also a marketing piece.

The rules of thumb for a basic resume aren't really as challenging as some would think. Unless you are in a technical field or seeking an executive position, your resume shouldn't be more than one page. It should include your objective at the top, your education, and your last ten years of work history in chronological order with the most recent first - working backwards.

Depending on the space available, you can add a "Special Skills" Section. Though some prefer to indicate that references are "available upon request," I advise adding the names, titles and phone numbers of two references at the bottom. It just makes it easier on the hiring agent.

Resume how to can be complicated if you read a lot of the literature out there.? However, I've found that the best results come from using a one page format that includes all the relevant information a hiring agent needs without all the time wasting fluff.

What I've shared may sound like a lot of common sense, but there really is a process to creating a good resume. Streamlining work history is usually the key concern for most people. Resume preparation becomes more difficult, however, for those who have problematic situations, but even those can be resolved. If you have limited work history, making your resume appear "thin," then add or elaborate on a "Special Skills/Training" section or "Special Skills/Experience" section. If you don't have a college degree or formal education beyond high school, you can still use your graduation from high school on your resume. Include other training, as well. For those with a long military background, make sure your duties are expressed in everyday language, and show a relation between that work and your new career objective.

The most important action to take when preparing and writing a resume is to adopt a marketing mindset. With a basic format and the right mindset, that resume headache you started out with will never haunt you again.

Writing Resumes
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