Jump Start Your Creative Writing Career Now

By: Mario R. Churchill

My family is very traditional, especially when it comes to careers. I don't know why, but the only profession my folks recognize is the medical profession. So, during family gatherings or parties, they gawp at me when I say I am a creative writer.

My family may be a wee-bit extreme. But, in my experience, many people perceive writing as just some sort of a hobby. They say that even famous novelists and poets were either teachers or editors. Nobody in his or her right mind will consider writing as a career.

The gross misconception that writers, particularly creative writers, are paupers is actually a result of our own opinion about our writing career. Playwrights, poets, novelists, and other creative writers are often portrayed in movies and books as helpless romantics who would rather starve than rewrite their masterpieces to fit the whims of kings and queens.

Gone are the days when writers were stoned to death if their books or ideas contradict the norm of the time. Writers can now freely express their ideas in whatever manner that pleases them.

Don't fret my friend, if you are a budding writer. There is hope for you to succeed and create a name for yourself. JK Rowling, Dan Brown, and Stephen King, to name a few, all started as nobodies like you an me. Now, almost everyone in the planet knows them.

Here are some tips that could help jump-start you creative writing career today:

Consider Creative Writing as a Business

Many writers end up losing money in writing because they do not treat the profession as a business. How would you know if you are making a profit from creative writing if you do not have some sort of an accounting system?

The first thing you have to do is to tally all your expenses. You must account all the things that you use in writing as expenses - papers, ink, pens, and even your Internet connection. Aside from supplies, the number of hours you spend in writing and the seminars and workshops you attended and paid for are all considered as expenditures, or business investments.

After knowing how much you have invested in your writing career, you now think of your return on investment. How much do you need to earn in order to achieve a return on investment that will make you happy? Knowing your expenses and your target profit will help you decide how much you are going to charge for your writing.

Start plotting your career

The success of a business usually depends on a great business plan. As a writer, you should also have some sort of a plan on what direction you want your career to go. Are you interested in writing for advertisements? Do you want to be a murder or mystery writer? Or are you keen on making self-help e-books?

After determining which path to take, writers should now looking for ways to improve their craft. Attending seminars and workshops, and investing in good reference materials, magazine subscriptions and computer hardware and software are all going to help you hone your skills.

Think out of the box

Always find creative ways to sell your stuff. Ironically, a lot of writers do not have much imagination in marketing their work. Many of us just send our manuscript to publishers and wait for them to call us, while some hire book agents to assist them.

Nowadays, getting published is not the only solution for writers. If publishers denied your work, you can either publish it yourself or sell it as an e-Book. You can also create your own website and post all your writings there for free. Lastly, don't be afraid to try new things - blogging, podcasting, etc.

Writers do not have to despair and be suicidal if no publishing house will accept their work. They can now make use of the Internet to bring their masterpieces to the global market.

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