How To Conduct a Local Job Search

By: Morgan Hamilton

A large number of the positions offered in the newspaper were for waitresses and bartenders or careers requiring previous experience. I assume that many entry-level job offers never made it to the newspaper. I had a guidance counselor in college and he advised me to conduct a local job search through the campus resource center. This was a good idea, even though that it turned out to be very hard to look for local jobs when you are eighty miles away from home. Those students able to find a good job were often somehow connected to the business.

I spent quite some time sifting through the employment advertisements in the paper and I felt that it didn't matter what I knew, it only mattered who I knew.

That's not the real truth, but just an excuse. I might have searched for internships not immediate employment. If I had a plan it would have been much easier. To conduct a successful local job search you should do more than reading the advertisements in the newspaper, which can only make you lose hope. One of the main disadvantages of the "help wanted" section in the newspapers is that the advertisements are quite short and superficial, so you cannot know what this employers wants in his new employee.

Imagine you'd have to change places with the employer. It is hard to employ someone only after getting their response to an advertisement. There was a dire need the local job search method be changed. Nowadays the World Wide Web offers numerous possibilities to conduct a local employment search. Now searching for a local job is much different than it used to be in the past. No matter what kind of position you might be looking for, whether entry-lever, advanced or professional, you can find it through the Internet. It only takes a few clicks before you find a local job offer that might be the right one for you.

Careers and Job Hunting
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