Think Twice Before You Jump To A New Job

By: Ramon Greenwood

Think Twice Before You Jump To A New Job by Ramon GreenwoodYou've got the itch to change jobs. This might be a good time tomake the move. The Wall Street Journal has just reported,"Job-seekers from rank-and-file workers to senior executives arepreparing their resumes for what may be the strongest fallhiring season in years."

"Before you jump to a new job, be certain you have good, soundreasons for wanting to make a change," advises Ramon Greenwood,senior career counselor at Common SenseAtWork.com> "You maybelieve you can accelerate your career with a new job. You maybe bored or running away from personal problems."

First, ask yourself, "Are there things I can do to make mypresent situation more acceptable?"

Don't be lulled into believing that the grass will necessarilybe greener in another pasture. Or that a new pasture will be agreat deal different from the one you are grazing in now.

Except in the most extreme reasons, do not leave your presentjob until you have another one firmly in hand. If it was evertrue that a bird in hand is worth two in the bush, it is when ajob is concerned. Remember, it is always easier to get a jobwhen you have one.

What Do You Want?

Take the time to figure out what you really want to do.

What will it take to make you happier? It is not enough to knowwhat you want to change from; you need to know what you want tochange to.

Be specific in answering these questions. Don't allow yourselfto be driven by a sense of vague malaise to make a change justfor the sake of change. If you can't spell out in writing thevalid reasons you want to move to a new job and be equallyspecific about what you want that job to be, don't set theprocess in motion.

Recognize that you are contemplating a serious and difficultundertaking, even under the best of circumstances. There isalways some risk to your present situation when you startlooking around. What will your present employer think if theword gets around that you are "looking"? At best, the wholeprocess is usually disruptive and can be traumatic for you andyour loved ones. Determine that you have the courage to livewith the dangers and uncertainties of making a change.

Survey the situation. Be sure there is a market for the skillsyou have to offer where you want to live.

If You Go, Go Full Speed Ahead

If, after giving the matter careful thought, you are convincedyou would be better off in a new situation, go for it full speedahead. The search for a new job is not a time for half-measures.To vacillate between courting new employers and sitting back ina coy mode, hoping to be courted, will surely breed frustration.Mount a campaign and invest whatever time and energy arerequired to reach your objective. If you have something to offerthat the market wants, you will find a new job. However, it willtake time. There may come a point when you decide that bycomparison your present situation looks quite attractive. So youmay decide to stay put, at least for the time being. So don'tburn bridges behind you.

And don't worry about there being a stigma attached to changingjobs. A lot of other people are shopping for new jobs at anygiven time. It has been estimated that today's college graduatescan expect that on average they will have held eight differentjobs by the time they are 40.

In fact, some personnel recruiters argue that your resume willbe stronger if it shows some changes in jobs, so long as thereasons for changing are positive.

Careers and Job Hunting
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