Engineering your Job Search

By: NES Group

Before you enter into the job search you need to clarify exactly what it is you are looking for and make a clear plan of action. To succeed, there are some fundamental techniques you can use to set you on the right path.

Think about what the employer is looking for in a potential employee and what you have to offer. What your talent is, and how it can be used by an employer is known as employment value. Do not expect employers to discover this value alone, know who you are and what you have to sell.

Resources - where to look

Review job leads: through newspapers, specialist journals, industry websites and recruitment agencies. Research and contact employers. Send out speculative CVs to specific companies you have interest in and target the particular individual who heads the department you would like to work for. Don't forget to explain in your cover letter or over the phone why you have pinpointed them.

Network. This is the act of contacting people who can assist in your search. Prepare your CV. It must be up to date, printed and in a ready to mail or present on demand format.

Traditional job hunting techniques

Although newspaper adverts represent only a small proportion of the job market it is one of the options you should be employing to strengthen your search. If you use the classifieds as a primary source of job leads you will consequently encounter a lot of competition. The most effective method is to utilise a combination of strategies focusing on both the hidden job market and the advertised job market.

Your recruitment consultant is a primary source of support. An agency is focused on achieving the right results for you, and has greater access to job openings. You can discuss job criteria with your consultant and they can offer advice on how to best progress your job search.

The non-traditional job search

To conduct an active search, tap into 'the hidden job market'. A recent survey discovered that three out of every five job-postings are not listed in newspapers or on electronic job boards. Network by attending local meetings, become active in professional organisations and community groups, speak with associates and acquaintances and ask people who and what they know. Register with appropriate mailing lists, newsgroups, and chat forums. A network of career contacts can provide support, information and job leads. Keep records to maintain effective links with the leads you have engaged, and be ready for the next move.

And finally, get organised and get committed. The biggest mistake most people make is finding excuses for not being proactive in their job search. Develop a daily plan and stick to it. When you are offered a position and you would like to accept, send a note/email to all the people who helped you, relaying the good news. This will ensure the continued growth of your career. By occasionally contacting these people you will remain open to opportunities.

www.nes.co.uk

Careers and Job Hunting
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