Leveraging Customer Service Jobs

By: Asc Connections

An entry-level customer service job does not need to be a terminal position for qualified professionals. The grind of handling returns, speaking with angry customers and working in a phone centre can discourage young professionals from seeking higher customer service jobs. It is important for every customer service representative to set a series of short, medium and long-term goals that add some gravity to every customer interaction.

Your first step in rising up the customer service ladder is demonstrating an interest in the long-term development of your employer. Your attendance at optional meetings for stockholders and company employees can give you an insight into the future of the company. The best way to show your commitment to the company is to use every conversation as an opportunity to learn more about corporate developments. A one-on-one meeting with a supervisor should feature questions about the motivations behind product lines as well as the intricacies of marketing campaigns. These conversations show your desire to rise to new positions while drawing the focus of your co-workers to important questions.

You can bypass other customer service professionals for promotions and raises with an expertise in the next generation of products sold by your employer. A look at websites and magazines reviewing your employer's products gives you insight into the opinions of outside experts. Many customer service professionals fail to take advantage of a vast library of product information available in the workplace. Your consumption of instruction manuals, pamphlets and advertising pieces will help you see where the company is heading.

It is important to take advantage of leadership opportunities if you want to rise above low-paying customer service jobs. You can take charge of your section of cubicles if your employer does not provide a clear chain of command. You should also speak with your supervisor about a willingness to take on tasks from office party planning to focus group observations. This flexibility and willingness to lead will help your candidacy for customer service jobs stand out.

The best way to guarantee a successful career in customer service is developing a close relationship with a mentor. This mentor should have experience within the company as well as the customer service field. A good mentor/protegee relationship is not a one way street. Your mentor can provide frank insight into the challenges and rewards of customer service jobs while you provide creative and original insight on the mentor's projects.

Careers and Job Hunting
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