Dump Your Next Boss?

By: Paul Megan

I guess we all expect to be screened by a prospective employer. It's part of a traditional job search. And it goes like this.

You write and rewrite your resume until you've fine-tuned it to say exactly what you want a good impression of you to look like. Then you mass distribute it by posting it on a bunch of job sites like Monster or Hot Jobs. And you direct mail or email it to as many companies as you can think of. You answer tons of job opening ads. Maybe you contact some agencies and recruiters.

You figure that pretty much covers all the work you have to do. Now it's up to the employer. So you wait for the phone to ring. Or an invitation to arrive in the mail. But after a couple weeks with little or no response you begin to realize this approach is something of a crap-shoot.

But let's say the job search gods have smiled on you and someone invites you in for an interview. Now the screening process begins. Chances are you'll meet first with some personnel staffer or lower level assistant. They'll perfunctorily ask you traditional questions in an effort to see if you meet the basic qualifications. Of course, you do your part. You dress nice, act pleasant, and jump through all the hoops as best you can.

Your biggest problem is not your credentials. It's the competition. And you'll never find out how you'll stand against the competition. However, one clue you're winning is an invitation to come back for further interviews. And someday you might even get the chance to meet face-to-face with the person who could be your next boss.

By the time that opportunity rolls around you're so grateful you got this far you wouldn't think of rejecting your next boss. But you should. Sometimes the person you might report to just isn't right for you. Here are some red flags to watch out for.

1. The prospective employer has done nothing to prepare for your meeting.

2. Focusing on you personal life, e.g. marital status, living arrangement, family life, etc. instead of your capabilities and assets.

3. Unprofessional or inappropriate behavior.

4. Avoiding or sidestepping your questions about details of the job or the organization.

5. Pretending to have more authority than he/she actually has, especially when it comes to who has the final decision for hiring you.

6. Telling you they're rewriting the rules for you.

When you follow the traditional approach we outlined above you don't have a lot of choices. But there's a better approach that puts you in total charge of your future without all the resume and interview hoopla. And jumping through someone else's hoops.

It's called the "alternative job search" approach or "non-traditional career advancement." These remarkable and innovative strategies can show you how to meet directly with your next boss in a matter of days without all the screening. And lock up a high-paying job in as little as two weeks!

Careers and Job Hunting
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