The Entrepreneurial Element

By: Shay Rosen

It may seem as though entrepreneurs are born, not made, yet countless entrepreneurs with ideas as valid and promising as some of the best ever conceived will eventually fail. This leads to the obvious question of why some entrepreneurs seem destined for success while others are relegated to a life of working for someone else. There are certainly multiple uncontrollable factors that come into play for most, such as the old but so often true cliche of being in the right place at the right time and how far the individual is willing to go to succeed. In truth, however, most entrepreneurs fail because they simply have little in the way of business sense outside of the desire to start one.

If sound ideas and relentless initiative are the true entrepreneurial element that separates those willing to take chances to reap greater rewards from the rest of us, the understanding of how to run a business is the gravity that keeps all entrepreneurs from taking flight. Those who have it will be able to turn their ideas into success, while those who don't will either fail and give up or continue on until they learn from trial and error. Unfortunately, the stakes of starting a new business make trial and error an expensive proposition.

For those serious about their business plans, it pays to be educated. Many entrepreneurs avoid education as a matter of principle, but doing so can have adverse consequences on their future endeavors. Education, in the mind of the dedicated entrepreneur, should be thought of as a means to an end. Getting a business education doesn't compromise the entrepreneurial spirit, it simply enables ideas to flourish while increasing the odds for a successful venture.

In truth, a bachelor degree program in business administration or management is an ideal educational pursuit for someone contemplating their own enterprise, though there are several other options that will work as well. From associate's level programs to diplomas and certificates, there are many ways to become better acclimated with business practices and acumen without committing to a full four years of college or the associated expenses.

Not only can education mean the difference between success and failure, it can also give entrepreneurs something to fall back on. Though the idea of not succeeding is something no one with the entrepreneurial element wants to even consider, it's never a bad idea to cover all the possibilities.


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